How Much Distance Do I Need For Construction Near A National Highway?

No construction will be allowed within five mts of the boundary stones on the National Highway.

How close to a highway can you build a house?

Freeway pollution travels farther than we thought. Here’s how to protect yourself If anyone knows where to find refuge from air pollution near Los Angeles freeways, it’s Suzanne Paulson. The UCLA atmospheric chemistry professor has spent years studying how invisible plumes of dirty air from car- and truck-choked roadways spread into surrounding neighborhoods — increasing residents’ risk of cancer, asthma, heart disease and other illnesses.

So when she bought a home in the Sunset Park neighborhood of Santa Monica in 2007, she made sure it was on a quiet street far from the 10 Freeway — well beyond the where California air quality regulators say it’s unhealthful to put homes, schools and day cares. But it wasn’t far enough. In the late night and early morning, it turns out, traffic pollution drifts much farther than during the day, and can extend more than a mile downwind from the freeway.

That discovery, made by Paulson and her colleagues, is one example of new research revealing how much your exposure to harmful levels of vehicle pollution is affected by your specific surroundings. It’s not only your distance from traffic, but other details such as wind patterns, freeway design, the time of day and the types of cars, trucks and buildings around you that determine the risk. Traffic flows below a pair of affordable housing developments under construction next to the 110 Freeway at El Segundo Boulevard in Los Angeles. Southern California is experiencing a near freeways that is pushing more people into high-pollution zones.

But just because state and local officials are allowing new housing there doesn’t mean it is safe, health experts say. When choosing a home, school or day care, aim for locations as far from the freeway as possible. Avoid sites within 500 feet — where California air quality regulators warn against building — or even 1,000 feet.

That’s where traffic pollution is generally highest, along with rates of asthma, cancer, heart attacks, strokes, reduced lung function, pre-term births and a growing list of other health problems. Also avoid living near major roads — those carrying more than 100,000 vehicles a day — which, according to air quality regulators, can pose health risks similar to freeways. Cars and trucks pass by a 198-unit luxury apartment complex under construction in 2015 next to the 91 Freeway at Artesia Boulevard in Cerritos. If you have a central heating, air-conditioning or ventilation system, install high-efficiency air filters.

They should be rated 13 or higher on the 16-point industry MERV scale (Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value) that measures how effectively they block tiny pollution particles. Make sure to replace them on schedule, about every few months. Most will not remove toxic exhaust gases such as benzene and 1,3-butadiene.

To screen those out, you need more costly charcoal filters. Also factor in the age of your building. Filters are less effective in older homes, which let in more pollutants, and work better in newer dwellings that seal off more outside air. If you live in a new home near a freeway in Los Angeles or San Francisco, high-efficiency filters may already be required.

And the California Energy Commission is moving to require MERV 13 air filtration in all newly constructed dwellings starting in 2020. But those rules will do nothing to reduce pollution in existing homes, including those occupied by more than 1.2 million people in Southern California who already live within 500 feet of a freeway.

Don’t have central air? Adding one or two stand-alone air-cleaning devices to your home can help reduce particle pollution levels, so long as you keep them running 24/7. But air cleaners are effective at lowering particle levels only in a single room, not an entire home. Joan Winget stands outside her home in Sun Valley, which sits near the 5 Freeway. To protect herself from car and truck pollution, she keeps her doors and windows closed and runs the air conditioning nonstop. If you can’t avoid living near a freeway, some locations offer more protection than others.

It’s better to live behind a sound wall, especially one with thick trees and plants extending above it. Such obstacles, though not designed to block vehicle emissions, can reduce pollution levels immediately downwind. It’s also preferable to live near a freeway that is elevated above or sits well below your home.

That vertical separation can help disperse pollutants. At-grade freeways, where lanes sit at the same level as surrounding buildings, are worse because they put vehicle tailpipes right next to people’s lungs. If you live on a major boulevard, you’re better off when there are buildings of varying heights, parks and other open spaces that allow allow exhaust pollutants to disperse up and away from traffic,, Postpone outdoor exercise to later in the morning to dodge the spike in traffic pollution in the pre-sunrise hours. That’s when stagnant weather conditions, caused by nighttime cooling, trap freeway pollution near the ground. That slows down the dispersal of emissions, allowing them to drift more than a mile downwind, compared to no more than 1,000 feet during the day.

Levels of ultrafine particles, nitric oxide and hydrocarbons are highest in the early morning, aided by a big injection of exhaust from morning rush hour. Those conditions usually break up once the sun has been up for a few hours and winds pick up again. It’s also better to keep your windows closed in the early morning hours.

You may think it’s safer to leave them open after traffic dies down at night, but suggests the opposite. Students play at Elizabeth Hudson K-8 School next to the Terminal Island Freeway in Long Beach. Spending time in a car on the freeway can expose you to pollution levels five to 10 times higher than surrounding areas. Even with the windows up, you could be breathing up to 80% of the levels of pollution found in traffic if your vehicle’s ventilation system is drawing in outside air. Everett Smith looks out at rush-hour traffic on the 101-110 freeway interchange from his seventh-floor balcony at the Orsini apartments in downtown Los Angeles in 2015. The risk to your health can be compounded if you live near multiple pollution sources.

Avoid living close to highway interchanges and freeway ramps, which regulators and scientists have identified as hot spots that can hit residents with twice as much as pollution. Keep away from major intersections and stoplights, where vehicles spit out a lot of exhaust when drivers step on the gas, and copper dust and other toxic particles when they hit the brakes.

“There’s basically a big cloud of fairly concentrated pollution when the light turns from red to green,” Fruin said. Also factor in whether you live in a smoggy area. If you live near a freeway in a community with higher smog levels, like the Inland Empire, you could get a double dose of dirty air from traffic emissions piling on top of regional pollution. It’s especially unhealthful to live near freeways and roads frequented by diesel trucks, which spew many times more harmful gases and particles than cars. Diesel particulate matter, carcinogen-laden soot that deposits deep in the lungs, is responsible for the bulk of the cancer risk from air pollution and more than 1,000 early deaths a year in California.

Experts are most concerned about people living near ports, warehouse distribution centers and other freight corridors. Asthma rates and cancer risk there can be so elevated that physicians have labeled it the “diesel death zone.” An air-monitoring station next to a truck-congested stretch of the 60 Freeway in Ontario had the highest levels of fine-particle pollution, or soot, of all near-roadway sites in the nation, according to 2015,

About 217,000 vehicles a day passed by in 2015, more than 29,000 of them trucks. A monitoring device measures air pollution levels along the 60 Freeway in Ontario, Calif. The kinds of vehicles traversing your neighborhood can have a big effect on how much pollution you breathe. Paulson and other scientists have detected huge disparities among L.A. Amelia Mueller-Williams displays a finger with soot she removed from the windowsill of her apartment close to the 405 Freeway in West L.A. The that deposits on the windows, shelves and patios of people living near traffic? If it’s big enough to see, it probably can get into your mouth or nose, and not much farther than that.

Clean it up, especially if it’s dark or sooty in color, said Fruin, the USC professor. “If you run your finger on your windowsill and it’s black, that’s a bad sign because it means you’re getting a lot of diesel soot.” More important, soot can be an indication of traffic pollution you can’t see but may be breathing in.

Scientists are especially concerned about ultrafine particles, exhaust pollutants less than one-thousandth the width of a human hair. They’re so tiny they can lodge deep in the lungs and move into bloodstream, where they may harm the heart, brain and other organs.

  1. Ultrafine particles are suspected of causing some of the illnesses among people living near traffic, but more research is needed to say for certain.
  2. A truck exits the 710 Freeway next to an apartment complex at East Alondra Boulevard in Compton.
  3. Cars and trucks keep getting cleaner, but don’t count on electric vehicles bringing an end to traffic-related health problems.

Switching to zero-emission vehicles only gets rid of tailpipe-generated pollution. It does nothing to reduce non-exhaust pollutants, including dust from brake pads and tires that contains toxic metals, rubber and other compounds that are kicked up into the air.

  • Scientists trying to pinpoint the most harmful agents in traffic pollution are just beginning to study the health effects of those non-tailpipe pollutants.
  • The switch to electric vehicles will certainly reduce the public’s exposure to engine-related emissions,” said Ed Avol, a professor of preventive medicine at USC.

“But this other kind of pollution generated by the frictional forces of tires and brakes and from lubricating oils is likely to remain in some form for years to come.” Times staff writer Jon Schleuss contributed to this report. : Freeway pollution travels farther than we thought.

How much distance do I need for construction near a national highway in Punjab?

PWD frames rules for constructing buildings on roadside August 03, 2022 08:22 pm | Updated 08:22 pm IST – Bengaluru The Public Works Department of the State has come out with guidelines for preventing construction of illegal buildings near State highways, district major roads, and other roads, and for providing sufficient space for widening of roads and smooth movement of vehicles.

  • As per the new guidelines, on the State highways, developers have to construct buildings or shopping complexes from a distance of 40 meters from the middle of the highway road.
  • Similarly, in major district roads, developers have to construct buildings from a distance of 25 meters from the middle of the road.
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In the city corporation limits, buildings would be allowed to be constructed from a distance of 12 meters from the road and it would be six meters in urban local bodies such as city municipal councils, town panchayats, and gram panchayats, according to guidelines issued by the PWD.

How much distance do I need for construction near a national highway in Gujarat?

Roadside Land Control Rules, 1964 (in brief the Rules) provides that the construction of the building should not be allowed from the centre line of any road on National and Provincial Highways in open and agricultural areas 75 feet and in urban and industrial area 60 feet.

How much distance do I need for construction near a national highway in Karnataka?

16 Feb 2022 CW Team Under the Karnataka Highway Act 1964, the state government had issued notifications in 1998 and 2005, announcing that land up to 40 metre (m) from the centre of the state and national highway as no construction zone. Based on this notification issued by the government, the High Court (HC) had an order on 25 October 2021.The Public Works Department (PWD), based on this order, has issued notifications to 17 gram panchayats under the Udupi sub-division.

  1. According to the PWD, 40 m has to be set aside before constructing any new building.
  2. It had asked the urban and rural bodies to follow the order of the high court and the state government.Those who violate the order have been warned of legal action and imprisonment if found guilty.
  3. For the main roads in the district, 25 m from the middle of the road has been concluded as no construction zone.

For reconstruction and renovation or expansion of existing buildings, the rule of 40 m stays. The state government can undertake a border survey and take possession of the buildings within the 40 m limit by paying compensation.The government can also use smallholdings where no construction is possible for the HC order to lay services like roads, signals, footpaths, drains etc.

How close to highway is too close?

Researchers suspect the health risk from ultrafine particles is greatest downwind and within 300ft or 100m of a busy highway. Over the last 30 years, growing numbers of studies have shown that these ultrafine particles emitted by trucks and cars barreling down our highways can promote heart disease and strokes.

Is it OK to live close to the highway?

Living Near Highways and Air Pollution Being in heavy traffic or living near a road with heavy traffic may be risky compared with being in other places in a community. Growing evidence shows that many different pollutants along busy highways may be higher than in the community as a whole, increasing the risk of harm to people who live or work near busy roads.

The number of people living “next to a busy road” may include 30 to 45 percent of the urban population in North America, according to the most recent comprehensive review of the evidence. In January 2010, the Health Effects Institute published a major review of the evidence put together by a panel of expert scientists.

The panel looked at over 700 studies from around the world, examining the health effects of traffic pollution. They concluded that traffic pollution causes asthma attacks in children and may cause a wide range of other effects including the onset of childhood asthma, impaired lung function, premature death and death from cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular morbidity.

The area most affected, they concluded, was roughly the band within 0.2 to 0.3 miles (300 to 500 meters) of the highway.1 Children and teenagers are among the most vulnerable—though not the only ones at risk. A Danish study found that long-term exposure to traffic air pollution may increase the risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

They found that those most at risk were people who already had asthma or diabetes.2 Studies have found increased risk of premature death from living near a major highway or an urban road.3 Another study found an increase in risk of heart attacks from being in traffic, whether driving or taking public transportation.4 Urban women in a Boston study experienced decreased lung function associated with traffic-related pollution.5 Adults living closer to the road—within 300 meters—may risk dementia.

Health Effects Institute Panel on the Health Effects of Traffic-Related Air Pollution, Traffic-Related Air Pollution: A Critical Review of the Literature on Emissions, Exposure, and Health Effects. Health Effects Institute: Boston, 2010. Available at www.healtheffects.org. Andersen ZJ, Hvidberg M, Jensen SS, Ketzel M, Loft S, Sørensen M, Tjønneland A, Overvad K, and Raaschou-Nielsen O. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Long-Term Exposure to Traffic-related Air Pollution: A Cohort Study. Am J Respir Crit Care Med.2011; 183: 455-461. Finkelstein MM, Jerrett M., Sears M.R. Traffic Air Pollution and Mortality Rate Advancement Periods. Am J Epidemiol.2004; 160: 173-177; Hoek G, Brunkreef B, Goldbohn S, Fischer P, van den Brandt. Associations between mortality and indicators of traffic-related air pollution in the Netherlands: a cohort study. Lancet.2002; 360: 1203-1209. Peters A, von Klot S, Heier M, Trentinaglia I, Cyrys J, Hormann A, Hauptmann M, Wichmann HE, Lowel H. Exposure to Traffic and the Onset of Myocardial Infarction. N Engl J Med.2004; 351: 1721-1730. Suglia SF, Gryparis A, Schwartz J, and Wright RJ. Association between Traffic-Related Black Carbon Exposure and Lung Function among Urban Women. Environ Health Perspect.2008;116 (10): 1333-1337. Chen H, KJC, Capes R, et al. Living near major roads and the incidence of dementia, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis: a population-based cohort study. Lancet.2017. Published online http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/5014-6736(16)32596-X. Power MC, Weisskopf MG, Alexeeff SE, et al,. Traffic-related air pollution and cognitive function in a cohort of older men. Environ Health Perspect 2011;119:682–687. doi:10.1289/ehp.1002767

: Living Near Highways and Air Pollution

What is the road width of National Highway?

∴ The width of National & State Highways in plain and rolling terrain for the two-lane is 12 m.

What is the minimum width of National Highway?

This requires a minimum lane width of 3.75 m for a single-lane road. For a Nation highway corridor, the minimum width should be 5.7 m.

What is setback for National Highway?

Local bodies in Karnataka asked not to permit buildings within 40 m of highway centre line January 13, 2022 09:07 pm | Updated January 14, 2022 09:50 am IST – Mangaluru A view of the four-lane Tirthahalli-Malpe National Highway 169A in Manipal. The National Highways Division of the Public Works Department of Karnataka has told all urban and rural local bodies not to permit construction of buildings within 40 m from the centre line of any National Highway in their jurisdiction.

As such, 40 m on either side of any National Highway should be maintained as construction-free zone, the department has said. In one such recent letter to the Municipal Commissioner of Udupi City Municipal Council, the Assistant Executive Engineer of National Highways Sringeri Sub-Division brought to his attention an order by the High Court of Karnataka passed on September 7, 2021, that confirmed the department’s stand on the issue.

Two National Highways pass through Uudpi CMC limits — the Kochi-Panvel National Highway 66 and the Malpe-Tirthahalli National Highway 169A. No licence should be issued to construct buildings within the specified limits of these highways, the Assistant Executive Engineer said in the letter.

  • He also noted that the High Court had categorically stated that action should be initiated against officials concerned if buildings are permitted to be constructed within the construction-free zone.
  • Asked whether buildings on either side of National Highway 169A that cuts through Udupi and Manipal towns were located beyond 40 m from the centre line of the highway, an engineer responded in the negative.

He said that there could be very few. He did not comment on the fate of the buildings that have come up in violation of the rule. The letter, however, was written to ensure that the local bodies do not issue licence for building construction within the prohibited zone at least in future, the engineer said.

The High Court has in many instances upheld the Government’s stand on the construction-free zone for National Highways and State Highways (40 m from the centre line of the highway) and directed the demolition of buildings that have come up in Padubidri Gram Panchayat limits (August 2021) and Uppunda Gram Panchayat limits (July 2021).

The Government laid down the rules on April 1, 2002 specifying construction-free zones for National Highways, State Highways and Major District Roads (25 m). After the recent court orders, the Additional Chief Secretary to Government, Public Works Department wrote to all chief engineers of construction wings on December 13, 2021, to strictly adhere to the specifications failing which engineers concerned will be held responsible for violations.

What is the length share of National Highway?

State Wise List of National Highways in India with Length

State Length of National Highways (Kms)
Himachal Pradesh 2606.9
Jharkhand 3366.8
Karnataka 7334.8
Kerala 1781.6

How much does it cost to construct 1 km of road?

5 million per kilometre for a lightly trafficked paved rural road, while constructing and maintaining heavy freeway structures can cost tens of millions of rands per kilometre. Can India ever be able to build roads like the US?

What is the minimum distance beyond which a building can be constructed on a state highway?

The High Court has directed the National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) and other authorities concerned to ensure that constructions are not allowed in ‘no construction zone’ along the national highways. As per the provisions of the Karnataka Highways Act and a circular issued in 2005, there shall be no construction within 40 metres of the centre of national highway.

  • In a recent order, a division bench headed by Justice Satish Chandra Sharma directed demolition of constructions put up in Kaup town, Udupi district, on National Highway – 66.
  • The bench cited a December 1999 order of the Karnataka High Court.
  • In this order the court had directed the authorities to strictly abide by the restrictions on such constructions.

The rules mandate that there shall be no construction within 40 meters of national highways, state highways and 25 meters from the centre of road in case of district main road. “In the light of the aforesaid judgment and also keeping in view of the statutory provisions and also as per the circular dated 22 December, 2005, issued by the Government of Karnataka, the buildings constructed crossing the building line have to be demolished to the extent they are crossing the building line.

Also Read | Festive rush: Bengaluru-Hyderabad most sought after route in country The other important aspect of the matter is that the authorities who have granted permission for such unauthorised constructions also deserve to be proceeded in accordance with law,” the bench said. The court directed the government advocate to communicate the order to all the authorities concerned.

The bench said that in the case on hand, the Chief Secretary or an officer nominated by the Chief Secretary should hold a fact-finding enquiry for fixing the responsibility on the persons who have granted permission in respect of various buildings. The bench granted two months to initiate departmental enquiry/criminal prosecution, if law permits in accordance with law.

What is minimum distance requirements?

Minimum distance means the required minimum horizontal distance between any wall of a building and the nearest area side or rear lot line of the development area.

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What is the width of village road?

From the following, a typical cross section of which class h Option 3 : Typical village roads Free 10 Questions 10 Marks 6 Mins Concept: Width of carriageway:

The width of the carriageway or the width of the pavement depends on the width of the traffic lane and the number of lanes. The width of a traffic lane depends on the width of the vehicle and the clearance. Side clearance improves operating speed and safety. The maximum permissible width of a vehicle is 2.44 m and the desirable side clearance for single lane traffic is 0.68 m. This requires a minimum lane width of 3.75 m for a single-lane road. However, the side clearance required is about 0.53 m, on either side and 1.06 m in the center. Therefore, a two-lane road requires a minimum of 3.5 meters for each lane. Village road width as per IRC rules and guidelines minimum/standard for width of village road is 3m prescribed and 3.75 m for ODRs (other District road).

The desirable carriageway width recommended by IRC is given in the table:

Class of Road Width of Carriageway
Single lane 3.75
Two-lane, no curbs 7.0
Two-lane raised curbs 7.5
Intermediate carriage 5.5
Multi-lane 3.5

India’s #1 Learning Platform Start Complete Exam Preparation Daily Live MasterClasses Practice Question Bank Mock Tests & Quizzes Trusted by 3.4 Crore+ Students : From the following, a typical cross section of which class h

What is the minimum width of access road for the approval of land from the local authority?

(2) Lots having an access road of not less than 9.0m in width shall be provided with a turning circle of 15.0m in diameter or any other space with the same diameter at a suitable location on the street.22.

What is a good following distance on the highway?

Three Seconds May Not Be Enough – The NSC states that “three seconds is the minimum; five seconds is even better.” It also advises increasing following distance “significantly” in bad weather. When hauling a boat, trailer, or camper, the NSC says to add one second to your following distance for every 10 feet of additional length.

How far away from a main road should you live?

How you can protect your family from the perils of pollution street Published: 22:11 GMT, 16 January 2019 | Updated: 08:19 GMT, 17 January 2019 Do YOU live close to a road? Do you look out on a stream of school-run traffic? Can you sometimes smell car fumes in the garden? This week, Environment Secretary Michael Gove outlined plans to ban most wood-burning stoves by 2022, saying they produce particulate pollution in homes which could harm our health.

But what’s outside could be just as important. Dirty air has been linked to everything from insomnia and obesity to premature births, lower IQs, dementia and cancer. Last week, the family of nine-year-old Ella Kissi-Debrah, who died of acute respiratory failure caused by an asthma attack in 2013, were told they could apply for a fresh inquest to determine whether ‘unlawfully high levels of air pollution’ partially led to her death.

She lived near one of ‘s busiest roads. Thea Jourdan spoke to experts about the health risks associated with living near busy streets filled with high levels of air pollution Meanwhile, a concerning study found high levels of air pollution could increase the risk of miscarriage by 16 per cent — as much as that caused by smoking.

So, what exactly are the risks, and how can you protect yourself? THEA JOURDAN investigates. A QUESTION OF DISTANCE A traffic jam outside your front door can triple pollution levels. You’re more protected if you have a front garden, and your living room at the back of the house, but to truly cut exposure to air pollution, added distance from the road is key.

Studies suggest living 50 metres away reduces it by half. ‘Pollution should not be detectable by 200 to 300m away,’ says Professor Frank Kelly, the British Lung Foundation’s honorary science adviser. Living on a higher floor helps, too. ‘Pollution levels should be near background level by the 5th or 6th floor,’ he adds.

  1. When researchers at Queen Mary University of London measured levels of black carbon — or soot — on roadsides in London, they found the worst roads peaked at more than 10,000 nanograms per cubic metre of air for every five minutes of exposure.
  2. You should not be exposed to more than 35,000 nanograms per cubic metre of air over 24 hours, according to the Daily Air Quality Index.

A person living on a very busy road could reach that limit in less than 20 minutes. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines suggest new homes should be built away from roads. Planners should also consider outside ‘living’ walls covered in plants, as trees and shrubs soak up airborne pollutants.

  • TREES vs HEDGES
  • Tree leaves absorb carbon dioxide found in exhaust fumes, and help to trap pollution particles, known as particulates, which stick to them.
  • However, a University of Surrey study found a dense canopy of trees can trap toxic fumes near the ground, making road air pollution worse.

Hedges, however, can cut fumes by around a third at pavement level. Professor Kelly says: ‘Tree canopies are usually high enough to let pollution pass underneath into houses. Hedges, especially those that retain leaves in winter, are better.’ TRAFFIC OBESITY It sounds unlikely, but traffic has been linked to the obesity crisis.

Researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden found people who lived near a busy road were more likely to gain weight around their middle. Fats stored here increase the chance of diabetes and heart disease. Those who also lived under a flight path or near a railway doubled their risk of obesity. ‘Noise raises arousal levels,’ says Stephen Stansfeld, emeritus professor of psychiatry at Queen Mary University of London.

‘The body secretes “fight or flight” hormones: cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline. These raise heart rate and blood pressure, and encourage emergency fat supplies to form.’ Researchers claim those who live near busy roads are more likely to gain weight around their middle which can increase the chances of heart disease and diabetes (file image)

  1. WIND FACTOR
  2. Experts say if you walk on the windward side of the street, exposure to pollutants can be 50 per cent less than on the leeward side.
  3. DIFFICULT BIRTHS

A study found couples who live near noisy roads take longer to have a baby, possibly due to noise pollution disrupting fertility cycles. For every extra ten decibels of traffic noise, it was 5 to 8 per cent more likely a woman would take six months or more to conceive.

A 2011 study also found that if a mother lived within 400 metres of busy highways, she was likely to give birth almost two weeks earlier than other women. The scientists, from Australia’s Queensland University of Technology, believed it may be down to air and noise pollution causing extra stress in pregnant mothers.

Babies born to mothers who lived in busy traffic zones were also more likely to have low birth weights. Prematurity and low birth weight are linked to developmental delays, and even a risk of heart disease and diabetes later in life. Studies suggest it can take women who live near busy roads longer to conceive and they are also more likely to give birth early (file image) TICKER TROUBLE Professor Jeremy Pearson, associate medical director at the British Heart Foundation, says: ‘Chronic exposure to noise pollution can increase your blood pressure, which puts you at greater risk of heart disease and stroke.’ Noise is measured in decibels, up to 140.

A quiet suburb is usually 50 decibels, traffic comes in at around 80, while a siren is at least 100. Scientists at Imperial College London found adults exposed to more than 60 decibels of daytime traffic were 5 per cent more likely to be admitted to hospital with a stroke than those exposed to less than 55 decibels.

Another study found that for every ten-decibel increase in nearby road noise, the risk of stroke for those aged over 65 increased by more than a quarter. In streets with average night-time noise levels of at least 50 decibels, residents also had a 6 per cent increased risk of high blood pressure.

  • FEELING DEPRESSED
  • The charity Environmental Protection UK found that traffic noise ‘adversely affects 30 per cent’ of the population — and it could even be making you depressed.
  • The World Health Organisation says average night-time noise of 40 decibels — five cars passing each minute, 100 feet away — can cause insomnia and low mood.

But there is no ‘safe’ limit, says Dr Anna Hansell, visiting professor at Imperial’s School of Public Health. ‘Some people are more susceptible to noise and more likely to have health issues, including depression,’ she says. RESPIRATORY RISKS Traffic pollution can also cause respiratory problems.

Dr Penny Woods, chief executive of the British Lung Foundation, says diesel exhaust fumes can exacerbate existing conditions, too. Research found traffic fumes were responsible for 14 per cent of chronic childhood asthma, making it as bad as passive smoking. ‘Children are worst affected, as their lungs are developing.

They are then more likely to suffer lung disease as adults,’ says Dr Woods. Harvard scientists have discovered that children who live and go to school in areas with high traffic pollution levels on average score lower on IQ tests (file image) IQ RESULTS Children who live and go to school in areas with higher traffic pollution levels scored 3.7 points lower on IQ tests on average, according to Harvard scientists.

  1. DEMENTIA DANGER
  2. Long-term exposure to car emissions may lead to brain shrinkage associated with dementia.
  3. A 2017 study found those living within 50 metres of heavy traffic had a 7 per cent higher risk of dementia compared with those living more than 300 metres away.

People living 50 to 100 metres from a busy road had a 4 per cent higher risk, while for those living 101 to 200 metres away the risk was 2 per cent higher. Those who had lived less than 50 metres from a busy road all their lives had a 12 per cent increased risk.

Tom Dening, professor of dementia research at the University of Nottingham, says: ‘It is difficult to say conclusively that traffic pollution is the single factor.’ Recent studies suggest those who live within 50 metres of heavy traffic are at a higher risk of dementia than those who live more than 300 metres away (file image) CANCER LINKS A 2017 U.S.

study in Breast Cancer Research found for every unit increase of fine particulates in a woman’s local area, there was a 4 per cent increase in their chance of developing dense breast tissue — a risk factor for breast cancer.

  • Researchers also found that if children lived within 150 metres of heavy traffic, their risk of getting aggressive myeloblastic leukaemia increased by 30 per cent.
  • Dr Woods adds: ‘Diesel particulates are linked to lung cancer.’
  • PET PERILS
  • Our pets may be even more susceptible to health damage, as they have smaller organs than we do.
  • In cities, birds, squirrels, rats, mice and hedgehogs are dying of tumours caused by pollution, while ageing dogs often suffer Alzheimer’s-like brain damage.

Wood stoves and open fires can coat pets’ lungs in particulates, while traffic fumes cause lung tissues and blood vessels to become inflamed. This can then lead to irreversible brain inflammation. Dogs in industrialised areas also have an 8.5 times higher risk of developing canine malignant lymphoma.

What is Rule 170 in the highway Code?

Rule 170. look all around before emerging. Do not cross or join a road until there is a gap large enough for you to do so safely.

Is it good to buy property near highway?

Lower land cost – Due to the abundant availability of land along highways, the cost of land is comparatively lower than in the city’s prime areas. This translates into comparatively lower property prices for the buyers. Today, most of the big cities are developing on this model due to land scarcity in Central Business Districts (CBDs) and core residential hubs.

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How loud is it to live next to a highway?

Levels of highway traffic noise typically range from 70 to 80 dB(A) at a distance of 15 meters (50 feet) from the highway.

Are houses next to highways cheaper?

Cons of living near highways: –

  • Noise, Probably the most obvious downside to living near a busy road is the noise. While for some it’s just another part of life, it can be a serious problem for others. Depending on your home buyers, you may see the property become harder to sell.
  • Landlocked issues. While highways make it easier for people to get back into the city, they can also complicate existing routes to many houses. If there’s no proper way to get back to a house, this makes it hard for people to find alternative ways back to their homes. If you can, try researching extra roads in the nearby area, and inform buyers of the additional routes available to them.
  • Less safety. The iconic—and terrifying—scene in Stephen King’s ‘Pet Semetary’ did highways no favors when it came to parental approval. For many families with children or pets, highways are a serious no-go when it comes to buying a home. The risks and danger are a bit too much, and most families prefer the safety of more solitary streets.
  • Lack of privacy. Either there are neighbors walking by your home or people driving by in cars that will turn their head to look your way, there is certainly a lack of privacy to a degree. For a lot of people, this can make them feel insecure in the privacy of their own home and many might even consider installing reliable home security systems even though there is no actual evidence that homes near highways are more prone to break-ins.

How far should I build from the road?

(1) The minimum distance between the central line of a street and any building (other than a compound wall or fence or outdoor display structure) shall be 4.50 metres and the minimum distance between the street boundary and building shall be 2 metres for buildings upto 7 metres in height, in roads other than National Highway, State Highway, District Roads and roads notified by Panchayat; and it shall be 3 metres.

for National Highway, State Highway, District Roads and notified roads; and for buildings more than 7 metres in height the set back shall be minimum 3 metres from the boundary of any street/road. Provided that in the case of cul-de-sac not exceeding 150 metres length or pedestrian lanes or streets below 3 metres width it shall be sufficient if the distance between the plot boundary abutting the street and building is 1.50 metres for buildings upto 7 metres height irrespective of the distance from the central line of the road to the buildings.

(2) Any restriction under street alignment or building line or both, if any, fixed for the area and restriction under any Town Planning Scheme or any other rules or byelaws shall also apply simultaneously to all buildings in addition to the provisions contained in sub rule (1).

Why are houses built so close to the road?

Welcome back to Period Dramas, a weekly column that alternates between rounding up historic homes on the market and answering questions we’ve always had about older structures. Old houses are full of quirks. And, quite frankly, that’s why we love them.

  1. From the slightly askew doorways and irregular wide-plank floorboards to the often hand-forged hardware, these structures succeed in charming us down to their most granular details.
  2. But, the more we look at historic houses, the more we notice one common trait that seems to work against them: Old houses usually sit quite close to the road.

And often, they’re on main, heavily trafficked roads—even if the houses are touted as being on large plots of land. “I’ve had a lot of realtors tell me that it’s difficult to sell many of these houses that are right up against the road,” says Elizabeth Finkelstein, founder of Circa Old Houses,

  • It’s definitely a problem.” It seems like if you want to live in an older house and you also want the house to be set far back enough on the road to avoid the sound of traffic, you’d have to resign yourself to the fact that options are few and far between.
  • But why is that? What was the thinking behind building these houses so close to the road in the first place? One answer can be found in the plain practicality of being close to a road before the age of modern cars.

“It takes energy to get to and from the house, either by foot or horse and buggy,” speculated Bruce Irving, a realtor, renovation consultant, and former producer of This Old House, “You want the house to be easily accessed. So, why place it at the far end of a driveway or a big, big lawn?” To Irving’s point, many of the houses that are being sought after today as country escapes from city life were never conceived of as recreational estates, but rather as working farms.

We’ve come across lovely farmhouses everywhere from Stanfordville, New York to Springfield, Vermont, that both sit on over 70 acres of land, but are placed just off the road. Since these homesteads were organized around sustaining a working farm rather than a country estate, it makes much more sense for the house to be close to the road so that goods can easily be brought onto and off of the property while the rest of the land can be used for farming.

Something else to keep in mind is that in the 18th and 19th centuries, the concept of “street noise” as we know it today effectively didn’t exist. “There wasn’t that caustic terrible noise that comes from things like cars—you were dealing with horses and carriages.

The annoyances were fewer and further between,” says Finkelstein. “I really don’t think it was that bad to be placed close to a road then. If anything, it made life easier.” But while many of these houses were purposefully constructed close to roadways, sometimes the roads were retroactively widened to accommodate modern transportation.

“Cars in the late 19th century were very unusual, and I don’t know whether people recognized that, in 20 years, Ford and other manufacturers would create more accessible automobiles,” says Mosette Broderick, Clinical Professor of Art History at New York University.

“Thinking in terms of creating a good roadbed was certainly not a major concern of anybody until the 1920s.” What existed up until then, says Broderick, were rather crude roadways called “post roads” or “stagecoach roads,” which were paved over and widened as cars entered common use, and as drivers realized the benefits of driving on a paved road versus a dirt road.

Brockerick also pointed out that following the second World War, larger, more modern roads were often built parallel to the older stagecoach roads, a good example being the Long Island Expressway, which runs parallel to Route 25A or Northern Boulevard—which he calls “a real old-timer.” These advancements in urban planning had a two-fold effect on older houses.

  1. First, the newly paved, widened roads shortened the distance between the front door of the house and the edge of the road even more.
  2. And second, the modern highways added an entirely new, purposefully busy and highly trafficked road somewhere that wasn’t even in consideration when the house was originally built generations before.

Now, of course, there are exceptions to the observation that older houses hug the road. Grand estates for the wealthy, for example, were built further back from the road (though those are categorically different from the farmhouse-type of structure we’ve largely been considering here and are worth their own article.) Sometimes, if you’re lucky, you can find a house that has been purposefully moved further back on its lot to accommodate the desires of a modern buyer, like this restored 1840s-built house just north of Hudson in upstate New York.

  1. Then you can really get the best of both worlds.
  2. If you’re considering buying an older house, though, know that being close to the road is probably going to be part of the deal.
  3. But try not to view it as a detriment to the house.
  4. Think of it as yet another quirk to fall in love with, like the wavy glass in the windows.

Closeness to the road stands for a specific period of history, one without cars, and one when the house may have had an entirely different purpose from being a rural escape. And if you really can’t stand the thought of street noise interfering with an evening spent by the fire? Look for a house on a dead-end road—the street noise will be so low, you’ll practically forget which century you’re in.

What is the minimum distance beyond which a building can be constructed on a state highway?

Local bodies in Karnataka asked not to permit buildings within 40 m of highway centre line January 13, 2022 09:07 pm | Updated January 14, 2022 09:50 am IST – Mangaluru A view of the four-lane Tirthahalli-Malpe National Highway 169A in Manipal. The National Highways Division of the Public Works Department of Karnataka has told all urban and rural local bodies not to permit construction of buildings within 40 m from the centre line of any National Highway in their jurisdiction.

  1. As such, 40 m on either side of any National Highway should be maintained as construction-free zone, the department has said.
  2. In one such recent letter to the Municipal Commissioner of Udupi City Municipal Council, the Assistant Executive Engineer of National Highways Sringeri Sub-Division brought to his attention an order by the High Court of Karnataka passed on September 7, 2021, that confirmed the department’s stand on the issue.

Two National Highways pass through Uudpi CMC limits — the Kochi-Panvel National Highway 66 and the Malpe-Tirthahalli National Highway 169A. No licence should be issued to construct buildings within the specified limits of these highways, the Assistant Executive Engineer said in the letter.

He also noted that the High Court had categorically stated that action should be initiated against officials concerned if buildings are permitted to be constructed within the construction-free zone. Asked whether buildings on either side of National Highway 169A that cuts through Udupi and Manipal towns were located beyond 40 m from the centre line of the highway, an engineer responded in the negative.

He said that there could be very few. He did not comment on the fate of the buildings that have come up in violation of the rule. The letter, however, was written to ensure that the local bodies do not issue licence for building construction within the prohibited zone at least in future, the engineer said.

The High Court has in many instances upheld the Government’s stand on the construction-free zone for National Highways and State Highways (40 m from the centre line of the highway) and directed the demolition of buildings that have come up in Padubidri Gram Panchayat limits (August 2021) and Uppunda Gram Panchayat limits (July 2021).

The Government laid down the rules on April 1, 2002 specifying construction-free zones for National Highways, State Highways and Major District Roads (25 m). After the recent court orders, the Additional Chief Secretary to Government, Public Works Department wrote to all chief engineers of construction wings on December 13, 2021, to strictly adhere to the specifications failing which engineers concerned will be held responsible for violations.

How far from a road can you build?

According to the standard and conventional rules, minimum distance should be at least 5 meter between a building and road edge.