How To Do Post Construction Cleaning?

How To Do Post Construction Cleaning
Post Construction Cleaning Checklist

  1. Clean the walls.
  2. Clean the baseboards, trim, and window frames.
  3. Clean all windows and glass.
  4. Dust everything, including the ceilings and fans.
  5. Check and change all the lightbulbs if needed.
  6. Sweep, mop, and polish any hard flooring.
  7. Vacuum all carpets.
  8. Take out all the garbage.

How do you remove construction dust?

Careful with the Floors – Cleaning the floors will depend more on the type of floor surface. A carpeted floor will typically trap much more dust in it and can be handled with a vacuum, plus a dust brush extension. If you like, you can even use a steam cleaner to more vigorously clean up the ingrained dust.

An added bonus that comes with steam cleaning is that less dust will be kicked up into the air. If you’re cleaning a hard-surfaced floor, vacuuming or sweeping is a necessary first step. Don’t go straight to cleaning up the dust with a damp mop. You risk scratching the surface with the fine grains of dust you’re moving around.

A treated dust mop is another option you can use to safely remove the fine particles. Along the baseboards, used dryer sheets are very effective at getting into the nooks and crannies, gathering up dust. Once the floor dust is gathered up as well as possible, a damp – not wet – mop can be applied to the floor, using a cleaner appropriate to the surface material.

How do you clean the air after construction?

Using air purifiers and scrubbers for construction dust – Air-cleaning machines such as air purifiers, air scrubbers and blowers are designed to draw in construction dust from the air surrounding these devices and remove them from the area, leaving only fresh, clean air in the area.

These units work by extracting air from the room and capturing any dust particles in special-purpose HEPA filters, which may need to be cleaned from time to time during application to make sure they don’t become clogged or overloaded. While the dirty, dust-filled air is being removed from the area, another blower will pump in fresh air from the outdoors, keeping the air as clean and healthy as possible.

What is a HEPA filter? A true HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filter is a type of high-quality air filter that removes at least 99.97% of particles from the air that are at least 0.3 microns in size. These are used in air purifiers, vacuum cleaners and air ducts as these filters offer the best way to get rid of dust after building work and in environments where it’s critical for the air to remain clean.

In addition, these units will also remove any pollutants and overwhelming odours that are present in the air during construction work, such as the smells of paint, treated woods and various gases and fumes. By eliminating these odours, it makes the environment more comfortable for those working and living in it.

This approach makes air purifiers for construction dust extremely valuable during any form of construction project or renovation. Particularly in small, contained locations without a lot of in-built ventilation, these devices are critical in preventing those on-site from inhaling any dangerous particles that would otherwise be circulating in the atmosphere.

  1. In addition, it is not just the immediate construction area that needs to be considered.
  2. If people are living or working in other areas of the building while the renovation is ongoing, it is possible for dust to travel through air ducts or other avenues and infiltrate those spaces.
  3. That is why we would encourage the use of multiple air scrubbers or purifiers across the site for comprehensive construction dust clean up, primarily in areas where people will typically spend a long time (e.g.

bedrooms, kitchens, offices).

What does a post cleaner do?

Post-construction cleaning is a cleaning service done to new or renovated buildings. – From the word itself, “post-construction,” it is understood that this cleaning is done after the construction part. A construction contractor may do a general cleaning of debris, but detailed cleaning is not part of their job anymore.

Walls are clean and are free from marks, dirt, and smudges Power washing and cleaning of windows and frames Plastic/sticker removal from furniture, windows, and doors Dusting, wet and dry, of ceilings, lights, fans, heaters Floors, that are free from debris, especially on edges and corners, are clean and polished Vacuum cleaning Trim cleaning Threshold cleaning Cleaning of all appliances, cabinets, and shelves from inside and out Proper disposal of trash and debris Addressing of any safety issues, loose wires, and leaks, to the construction contractors Detailed checking, for the last time, of all the space, corners and inner surfaces once the cleaning is completely done

What is the fastest way to get rid of construction dust?

Home Renovation Cleanup Tips – The same risks associated with long-term exposure to construction dust are also present when tackling the initial cleanup. If you have current or past respiratory health concerns or are sensitive to dust, consider hiring professionals to help remove construction dust from your living spaces.

Protective goggles that cover your eyes A professional-grade N95 mask Work gloves or rubber gloves if there’s a chance you may encounter liquid chemicals

Post-Renovation Cleanup Tools Depending on the size of your renovation project, you may consider renting some equipment to make cleanup a little easier (see below). Professionals typically rely on wet-dry vacuums, for example, to handle larger bits of debris and construction dust.

A broom or long-handled duster A wet-dry vacuum

Microfiber cloth Plastic sheeting

Now that you’re equipped, it’s time to get started.

Seal off any areas of your home that weren’t affected by the renovation. If the construction area is still very messy, you may even consider covering doorways with plastic to avoid spreading dust into other parts of your home. If there’s furniture nearby, cover it with plastic or a bedsheet. You should also briefly cover any vents in the area to protect your HVAC system from dust.

Dust elevated surfaces using a broom or long-handled duster. Use your microfiber cloth to tackle places you can easily reach. This can be a time-consuming process. You’ll want to dust the ceiling, windowsills, window and door trim, and any hard surface dust might cling to, cleaning from elevated points in the room and working your way down toward the floor. The goal here is to move dust from difficult-to-reach places to lower surfaces that are easier to vacuum. It may take fine dust particles a while to settle, so after you’ve broomed and dusted high areas, wait about an hour before you clean the lower section and floor. This will also save you the time and energy of dusting twice. If you do the lower areas first, when you do the higher spots and the dust settles, you’ll have to clean the lower areas again.

Use a wet-dry vacuum to remove dust quickly and efficiently. It may take more than one pass to remove considerable dust accumulation. Watch for nails, splinters, bits of drywall, and other debris that may have been missed by the construction crew when cleaning.

How long does construction dust stay in the air?

Because of its small particle size, it can stay in the air for up to 12 days. Sometimes, when we don’t see dust, we might still smell it e.g. if a room smells ‘like concrete’ cement can be circulating in the air.

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How do you get rid of post construction smell?

General instructions that should apply to most situations: –

Close up the house and turn up the heat to 85-90 F. Leave it on all day and all night for 3-5 days. It is equally important to air out the house by opening a door and some windows for 15-25 minutes at least twice a day, three times is better. This will allow for the indoor air to be exchanged with the outside air. It takes at least a day, depending on the outside temperature, for the heated air to also heat the contents, materials, and structure of the house. Two or more days at the elevated temperature is needed to achieve a reduction. As the chemicals evaporate into the air the air can only absorb so much. If the “loaded” air isn’t ventilated to the outside, and replaced with outdoor air, then the chemicals can begin to be absorbed back into the contents, materials, and structure. After the 3-5 days are up, turn off the heat and ventilate thoroughly by opening windows and doors. Let the house cool for at least 24 hours before re-entry. Evaluate your experience in the house to determine if the “bake out” was successful, “good enough,” or needs more work. If it needs more work then repeat the “bake-out.”

If you find that this and other methods aren’t sufficient, (based on your individual reactions ranging from “nuisance” all the way to “debilitating”) then the only remedy may be to remove yourself from the source. In other words, move to another house.

What qualifications does a cleaner need?

Direct Application – You can apply for jobs with cleaning companies or any organisation that employs their own cleaners. There are no set entry requirements, but you’ll need to show employers that you’re reliable and able to do the job. Experience can help, particularly if you’re looking for specialised cleaning work.

What skills should a cleaner have?

Cleaner – The best job ads take two or three introductory sentences to tell prospective cleaners their unique service. Emphasize your company culture and working environment right here and take advantage of this opportunity to set your opportunity apart from competing listings. Cleaner Job Responsibilities:

Responsible for all basic cleaning in and around residences or office buildings.Cleans floors and rooms. including dust mopping, damp mopping, sweeping, vacuuming, dusting, picking up larger objects off the floor, and spot cleaning glass and windows.Cleans restrooms, including restocking dispensers, emptying trash, cleaning and sanitizing fixtures, cleaning mirrors, spot cleaning partition doors and walls, sweeping and mopping tile floors, and cleaning toilets and urinals.Vacuums, empties trash, and replaces liners.Sets up, stocks, and maintains cleaning equipment and supplies.Monitors and maintains sanitation and organization of assigned areas.Transports dirty linens to correct area to be cleaned and restocks areas with clean linens.Assists other departments when needed to ensure optimum service to guests.Performs additional duties as needed.

This part of your cleaner job description is the ideal place in your cleaner job description to discuss your working hours and benefits, advising applicants of seasonal work hours, overtime possibilities, or any particular staffing requirements. You can also sell prospective cleaners about the benefits — like vacation time and commuter or childcare reimbursements — that set your business apart.

Excellent communication and organizational skillsStrong interpersonal and problem-solving abilitiesHighly responsible & reliableAbility to work cohesively as part of a team

Education, Experience, and Licensing Requirements:

High school diploma, GED, or equivalentPrevious cleaning experience a plusValid driver’s licenseFamiliarity with Radio Frequency (RF) equipment preferred

Now that prospective cleaners are familiar with your company and the job requirements, put together a strong call to action to tell them exactly how and where to apply. Turn interested job seekers into actual applicants by letting them know who to contact at your company to apply and how to submit an application or resume.

What draws dust out of the air?

HEPA filters – High-efficiency particulate air filters, known as HEPA filters, can remove 99.97 percent of dust particles that are 3 microns in diameter, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), As of now, air purifiers that have a HEPA filter tend to be the best at filtering out dust from your space.

Is construction dust harmful?

NIOSH Warns of Silicosis Risks in Construction, Suggests Measures to Reduce Exposure

  • Contact: Fred Blosser (202)260–8519 June 1996
  • Exposure to respirable crystalline silica dust during construction activities can cause serious or fatal respiratory disease.
  • Employers and workers can take several steps to reduce exposures and lower risks.
  • Exposure to respirable crystalline silica dust during construction activities can cause silicosis — a serious and potentially fatal respiratory disease — but employers and workers can take practical steps to reduce risks, according to an Alert released by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
  • The NIOSH Alert, “Request for Assistance in Preventing Silicosis and Death in Construction Workers,” details the hazards related to silica exposure among construction workers, provides prevention recommendations, and contains cases reports of construction workers who have died or are suffering from silicosis.

Silicosis, a scarring and hardening of lung tissue, can result when particles of crystalline silica are inhaled and become embedded in the lung. The disease can be progressively debilitating and fatal. In construction, workers can be easily exposed to silica when using rock containing silica or concrete and masonry products that contain silica sand when preforming such tasks as chipping, hammering, drilling, crushing, or hauling rock; preforming abrasive blasting; and sawing, hammering, drilling, and sweeping concrete or masonry.

Even materials containing small amounts of crystalline silica may be hazardous if they are used in ways that produce high dust concentrations. “The human and economic costs of silicosis are unacceptable,” said NIOSH Director Linda Rosenstock, M.D., M.P.H. “It is vital that government, industry, labor, and the public health community work together to help employers and workers recognize these risks and take action to avoid them.” The following page contains recommendations for reducing workplace exposure to silica and preventing silicosis.

Among some in the construction industry there is a lack of awareness about the sources of silica exposure, the nature of silicosis, and the causes of the disease. Construction workers, managers, and equipment manufacturers urgently need information about the hazards of breathing respirable crystalline silica.

  1. NIOSH requests your assistance in disseminating this information to those at risk and to those who can effect prevention.
  2. NIOSH recommends the following measures to reduce exposures to respirable crystalline silica in the workplace and to prevent silicosis and deaths in construction workers: Recognize when silica dust may be generated and plan ahead to eliminate or control the dust at the source.

Awareness and planning are keys to prevention of silicosis. Do not use silica sand or other substances containing more than 1% crystalline silica as abrasive blasting materials. Substitute less hazardous materials.

  1. Use engineering controls and containment methods such as blast–cleaning machines and cabinets, wet drilling, or wet sawing of silica–containing materials to control the hazard and protect adjacent workers from exposure.
  2. Routinely maintain dust control systems to keep them in good working order.
  3. Practice good personal hygiene to avoid unnecessary exposure to other worksite contaminants such as lead.
  4. Wear disposable or washable protective clothes at the worksite.
  5. Shower (if possible) and change into clean clothes before leaving the worksite to prevent contamination of cars, homes, and other work areas.
  6. Conduct air monitoring to measure worker exposures and ensure that controls are providing adequate protection for workers.
  7. Use adequate respiratory protection when source controls cannot keep silica exposures below the NIOSH REL.
  8. Provide periodic medical examinations for all workers who may be exposed to respirable crystalline silica.
  9. Post warning signs to mark the boundaries of work areas contaminated with respirable crystalline silica.
  10. Provide workers with training that includes information about health effects, work practices, and protective equipment for respirable crystalline silica.
  11. Report all cases of silicosis to State health departments and OSHA.
  12. DDHS (NIOSH) Publication No.96–120

Obtain a copy of the NIOSH Alert, “Request for Assistance in Preventing Silicosis and Death in Construction Workers” DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No.96-112, or for information on other occupational safety and health concerns call: 1-800-35-NIOSH or 1-800-356-4674. : NIOSH Warns of Silicosis Risks in Construction, Suggests Measures to Reduce Exposure

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How do I get rid of post renovation dust?

Vacuum and Mop – How To Do Post Construction Cleaning After wiping and washing, it’s time to vacuum the dust remnants on the floor. Vacuum all corners of your home because these are, After a thorough vacuuming, go over all the floor areas with a mop. Even if you have covered your upholstery, sofas, beds and pillows, it’s advisable to vacuum them individually to ensure as much dust is removed.

Can breathing in old dust make you sick?

You may not think it’s a big deal when you breathe in dust, but for some people, it could bring on a lung disease called hypersensitivity pneumonitis. It’s an allergic reaction to particles in the dust, and it can cause symptoms like coughing and shortness of breath.

  1. You can get things back to normal if you get treated early and avoid breathing the stuff you’re allergic to.
  2. There are a variety of things that can cause hypersensitivity pneumonitis when you breathe them in, including fungus, molds, bacteria, proteins, and chemicals.
  3. Normally, the immune system – your body’s defense against germs – causes inflammation in your lungs as it clears away the things you’re allergic to.

After a while, the inflammation stops. But in some people who are “hypersensitive,” the lungs stay inflamed and cause the symptoms of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. If you catch it early and stop breathing in more particles, your lungs can heal. If you breathe them in over and over, your lungs will stay inflamed, and scars may develop, which can make it hard to breathe normally.

How long does it take for new construction off gas?

Bottom Line: How Long it Takes to Off-gas Formaldehyde from Homes – The data suggests it takes about two years for formaldehyde in newly built or remodeled homes to off-gas down to levels of the average home. However, higher humidity and temperatures can make VOCs off-gas faster, Smart Air

Are new construction homes toxic?

Choosing a Home with Fewer Toxins – When viewing the home consider the toxicity of the home as is, and the cost of replacing toxic building materials with non toxic building materials in order to create a healthier home for you and your family! Here are 7 items to look for when choosing a home that is new-to-you:

Age of Home Newly built homes are one of the largest sources of toxic building materials off-gassing chemicals such as VOCs and SVOCs. Why is that? Everything is new—from the framing and insulation to interior finishes and furnishings—and products are off-gassing at a maximum amount. Consider choosing a home that was built 10-20 years ago or more, and that hasn’t been recently remodeled. Time Since Remodel Standard materials such as new flooring, paint, wood trim and doors, cabinets and shower modules off-gas at higher amounts. Opt for homes that have not been newly remodeled, or those that have been remodeled with non toxic materials, particularly in areas that would be expensive to re-remodel!

Type of Flooring One of the contributors to indoor air pollution is flooring. Floor coverings made from vinyl, carpet, or laminate wood are the biggest culprits. All three types of flooring are well known for off-gassing chemicals used to make the product itself, add flexibility and cushion (vinyl flexibility, carpet foam), and hold them together (composite wood binders, carpet backing glues). Look for flooring made from 100% ceramic tile, or 100% solid hardwood. If you strike it lucky, they’ll be old-school solid hardwood flooring under carpeting! In that case, you might only need to refinish the floor with zero-VOC stain and finish instead of replacing the entire flooring. Ceramic tile is widely accepted as one of the healthiest types of materials. When buying a home with ceramic tile, check with the homeowner to be sure it’s 100% ceramic tile. If there are no grout lines in the flooring, the product is not 100% ceramic tile and is very likely made with vinyl or plastic. Fresh Paint Covering every wall and ceiling in the home, paint is a significant contributor to indoor air quality. Newly painted walls off-gas high amounts of VOCs (and other harmful chemicals). Sometimes the new paint can be detected through smell (the famous ‘new paint smell’), but chemicals in the air linger around far after the smell has gone. While paint is an easy-to-fix aspect of a home, keep in mind that you’ll have the additional cost of re-painting with zero-VOC paint in order to improve air quality in the home before moving in. Wallpapered Walls Wallpaper was popular in the 1980’s but still is seen in homes today. Ironically, paper is not typically the primary material in wallpaper. Vinyl is. (1) In addition to the wallpaper itself, the adhesives used to hang the wallpaper often contains chemicals. When buying a home look for a home that does not have large amounts of wallpaper, or has an amount of wallpaper that you’re willing to remove. Wallpaper that has been in place for decades is more likely to peel off easier than newly installed wallpaper and may end up costing less time and labor to replace. Shower Module Plastic shower modules are popular in remodeling, as one of the less-expensive options. However, the plastics and resins used off-gas chemicals at a normal temperature. Plus, they off-gas even more in high temperature and high humidity environments. The exact environment often created by a steaming hot shower. Look for showers and bathtub surrounds made from 100% ceramic tile. Be sure the grout or caulk between tiles is secure before buying a home. If it’s not, add that to your list of ‘to be fixed’ when you purchase the home in order to minimize mold and water damage. This allows you to use zero- or low-VOC grout or caulk during repairs. Cabinets Older cabinets are often the best option when looking for a home to purchase. Cabinets are a high-cost item to replace and often made from plywood or composite woods. Even cabinets made with formaldehyde-free plywood today contain other chemicals found in plywood adhesives that may be harmful to health. Consider choosing a home with older cabinets and simply replacing the existing shelving with solid hardwood shelves, and refinishing existing cabinets with a zero- or low-VOC paint or finish. Or, if the cabinets are in shape, leave them as they are! If the cabinets have already been refinished by the current homeowner, ask if they used a zero- or low-VOC finish.

The younger version of me searched for the perfect home, but had not considered the impact that interior finishes could have on my health. It was a mistake that cost me in many ways for years to come. When looking for your new home, include “low chemical” to your list of criteria.

  1. Take into consideration the age of the home and when it was last remodeled.
  2. Preferably, no new materials have been installed for several years.
  3. Pay attention to the type of windows, flooring, wall covering and finish, shower and tub structure and cabinets in the home.
  4. If items need replacing due to age or newness (too many chemicals are still off-gassing), consider the cost of replacing those items with healthier alternatives after the home is purchased, before you make an offer on the home.

A little additional legwork up front to avoid high-chemical interior finishes can be helpful later on.

Why do construction workers smell?

The scent of building, or what is that construction smell? April 17, 2012, 3:43 am Filed under: Air Quality, Building knowledge, Hot Topic | Tags: construction, construction smell, Miami, odor, Sebastian Eilert, Sebastian Eilert Architecture, smell Construction sites are not the most pleasant places for both the workers and those around them.

Is there a chalky smell in your home or apartment after construction is finished? This is caused by dust buildup. This isn’t your average dust. It’s not dead skin or hair (eww!) but is rather, material shavings from materials like Sheetrock or ceramic tile. When ceramic tile is being cut for a bathroom, for example, the dust gets trapped in the ventilation. Or how about when you go through the final sanding process after mudding your drywall. First, trying to cover your furntiture, beds, countertops (anything you come into contat with on a daily basis) with a nice layer of Visqueen (that heavy duty plastic meant to keep your stuff safe. I also recommend buying a canister vacuum to get the dust out or suck it all in but then be sure to empty the canister in an outdoor area (not in the same place you just cleaned up). Sometimes, you just have to let the vacuum remain in one place for 30 seconds in order to attract all the dust. How do you handle noise pollution? Just because workers are up bright and shiny at 7 am doesn’t mean that the neighbors are ready to face the day. Loud equipment, delivery trucks and the ever-dreaded jackhammer create a most undesirable symphony that is simply diffiult to avoid. But, there are ways to alleviate the problem. Creating a construction plan that allows for the loudest of jobs to be executed during the middle to the end of the day helps for sure and reminding staff that everyone does not appreciate the latest in salsa or R&B. The garbage accumulated on a construction site is made up of food, bottles, construction debris, and general packaging. Creating a recycling program helps to separate this debris. Garbage pickup on a site can be expensive, so by setting up a recycling program you don’t incur the costs of added containers and you help alleviate those back-to-back days of paella delivery. Some cities even pay you for your recycled bottles. Another way to alleviate the amount of garbage is to provide your workers with metal bottles, such as a Sigg (mysigg.com). These bottles are reusable, can be dropped from high heights without being damaged and save the environment. Some common construction smells also include gasses and fumes. These come from paints, treated woods, some metals, old toilets, and even the construction equipment. The machines used on a construction site tend to run on gas which releases black clouds of smoke into the air. Many cities and states have made the use of machines that create these gas clouds illegal, so it is good practice to look into the more efficient and friendly alternatives. The fumes can also come from paints. High-VOC (volatile organic compound) paints tend to release noxious odors that damage brain cells and release harmful gasses into the environment. Low-VOC paint is the same price as the high-VOC paint, lasts just as long, and is just as durable, so why not make the switch? Another odor causing element of a construction site is standing water. Puddles and small pools can form during the excavation process (which releases unpleasant smells into the air ras well) and these pools, when left sitting for too long, begin to smell sulfurous. This is especially true is places like Miami which is situated right on top of its water table. These puddles should be drained from time to time in order to avoid them becoming either a stink pool or a breeding ground for insects such as mosquitoes.

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http://www.rez.org/2012/01/the-smell-of-a-construction-site/ http://www.cambridge.gov.uk/ccm/navigation/environment-and-recycling/pollution-noise-and-nuisance/ http://www.querrey.com/assets/attachments/15.pdf http://www.adbio.com/catalogs/BioWorld-Odor-Control-Catalog.pdf http://www.lhsfna.org/files/bpguide.pdf http://cfpub.epa.gov/npdes/stormwater/swppp.cfm

How do you remove dust from floor after construction?

Clean the Walls from Dust and Dirt Particles – Start by removing the dust from the ceilings and walls because even they collect dirt during home improvement. Dry dusting is the best way to wipe off the particles without fouling up the freshly plastered and decorated surface.

  1. However, in some cases, you can use a damp microfibre towel, depending on the type of paint used for the walls.
  2. Refer to the manufacturer before cleaning the surface with moisture.
  3. Don’t forget to vacuum all decorative embellishments like mouldings and pediments since the dust particles easily hide around their crevices.

Read also: 6 Ways to Fix and Conceal Decoration Mistakes How To Do Post Construction Cleaning Pay attention to details and carving of wooden furniture as dust and particles left from construction can easily get trapped there.

What is the best way to remove dust after renovation?

Use a vacuum and try not to touch the surface of the walls. If there’s too much dust left after the vacuuming, you can use some plain warm water, or slightly soapy water to wash away the remaining dirt. You can use a soft sponge or a towel to wipe them clean.

What happens if you breathe in construction dust?

NIOSH Warns of Silicosis Risks in Construction, Suggests Measures to Reduce Exposure

  • Contact: Fred Blosser (202)260–8519 June 1996
  • Exposure to respirable crystalline silica dust during construction activities can cause serious or fatal respiratory disease.
  • Employers and workers can take several steps to reduce exposures and lower risks.
  • Exposure to respirable crystalline silica dust during construction activities can cause silicosis — a serious and potentially fatal respiratory disease — but employers and workers can take practical steps to reduce risks, according to an Alert released by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
  • The NIOSH Alert, “Request for Assistance in Preventing Silicosis and Death in Construction Workers,” details the hazards related to silica exposure among construction workers, provides prevention recommendations, and contains cases reports of construction workers who have died or are suffering from silicosis.

Silicosis, a scarring and hardening of lung tissue, can result when particles of crystalline silica are inhaled and become embedded in the lung. The disease can be progressively debilitating and fatal. In construction, workers can be easily exposed to silica when using rock containing silica or concrete and masonry products that contain silica sand when preforming such tasks as chipping, hammering, drilling, crushing, or hauling rock; preforming abrasive blasting; and sawing, hammering, drilling, and sweeping concrete or masonry.

  1. Even materials containing small amounts of crystalline silica may be hazardous if they are used in ways that produce high dust concentrations.
  2. The human and economic costs of silicosis are unacceptable,” said NIOSH Director Linda Rosenstock, M.D., M.P.H.
  3. It is vital that government, industry, labor, and the public health community work together to help employers and workers recognize these risks and take action to avoid them.” The following page contains recommendations for reducing workplace exposure to silica and preventing silicosis.

Among some in the construction industry there is a lack of awareness about the sources of silica exposure, the nature of silicosis, and the causes of the disease. Construction workers, managers, and equipment manufacturers urgently need information about the hazards of breathing respirable crystalline silica.

NIOSH requests your assistance in disseminating this information to those at risk and to those who can effect prevention. NIOSH recommends the following measures to reduce exposures to respirable crystalline silica in the workplace and to prevent silicosis and deaths in construction workers: Recognize when silica dust may be generated and plan ahead to eliminate or control the dust at the source.

Awareness and planning are keys to prevention of silicosis. Do not use silica sand or other substances containing more than 1% crystalline silica as abrasive blasting materials. Substitute less hazardous materials.

  1. Use engineering controls and containment methods such as blast–cleaning machines and cabinets, wet drilling, or wet sawing of silica–containing materials to control the hazard and protect adjacent workers from exposure.
  2. Routinely maintain dust control systems to keep them in good working order.
  3. Practice good personal hygiene to avoid unnecessary exposure to other worksite contaminants such as lead.
  4. Wear disposable or washable protective clothes at the worksite.
  5. Shower (if possible) and change into clean clothes before leaving the worksite to prevent contamination of cars, homes, and other work areas.
  6. Conduct air monitoring to measure worker exposures and ensure that controls are providing adequate protection for workers.
  7. Use adequate respiratory protection when source controls cannot keep silica exposures below the NIOSH REL.
  8. Provide periodic medical examinations for all workers who may be exposed to respirable crystalline silica.
  9. Post warning signs to mark the boundaries of work areas contaminated with respirable crystalline silica.
  10. Provide workers with training that includes information about health effects, work practices, and protective equipment for respirable crystalline silica.
  11. Report all cases of silicosis to State health departments and OSHA.
  12. DDHS (NIOSH) Publication No.96–120

Obtain a copy of the NIOSH Alert, “Request for Assistance in Preventing Silicosis and Death in Construction Workers” DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No.96-112, or for information on other occupational safety and health concerns call: 1-800-35-NIOSH or 1-800-356-4674. : NIOSH Warns of Silicosis Risks in Construction, Suggests Measures to Reduce Exposure