How To Find Construction Type Of Building?

How To Find Construction Type Of Building
2. Size – Generally speaking, more significant buildings use heavier construction types. They will have floor spaces with long spans and heavily supported roofing systems. Smaller buildings have limited spaces and are not fire-resistant. The building size also affects the sprinkler thresholds and fire areas, and the law mandates for design and installation of fire protection systems for big buildings, thus affecting the building type. How To Find Construction Type Of Building

What is Type I and II construction?

NFPA Today – February 19, 2021 It is important to understand how a building will perform in a fire. Minimum construction requirements are established to help maintain structural integrity for the time needed for evacuation or relocation to a safe location in the building.

The combustibility of a material gives an indication of how quickly a fire will grow. Both of these aspects are essential to fire and life safety. NFPA 220, Standard on Types of Building Construction, defines types of building construction based on the combustibility and the fire resistance rating of a building’s structural elements.

When we talk about fire resistance rating, we mean the time, in minutes or hours, that materials or assemblies have withstood a fire exposure as determined by specific tests. NFPA 101 requires certain occupancies to meet minimum construction requirements, which can be found in section 1, subsection 6 of any of the occupancy chapter (XX.1.6).

  • NFPA 101 isn’t the only code that specifies minimum construction types, other codes, such as a building code will also specify minimum construction types.
  • Often times the type of construction that the building is permitted to be made out of correlates to how many stories the building will have and whether or not the building will have sprinklers installed.

NFPA Construction Types NFPA 220 breaks down building construction into five different types which relate to the material, each one of these types is numbered one through five (in roman numerals). When codes and standards refer to the type of construction required or permitted there are three numbers in parenthesis that follow the type of construction.

  • Type I: Noncombustible (or limited-combustible) construction with a high level of fire resistance, typically concrete construction.
  • Type II: Noncombustible (or limited-combustible) construction with a lower level of fire resistance than Type I, typically this is steel construction with or without fireproofing.
  • Type III: Exterior walls and structural elements are noncombustible or limited-combustible materials, and interior structural elements, walls, arches, floors, and roofs are wood that is smaller than what is required for Type IV construction. This is usually called ordinary construction and an example of this is a mixed masonry/wood building.
  • Type IV: Fire walls, exterior walls, and interior bearing walls are approved noncombustible or limited-combustible materials. Other interior structural elements, arches, floors, and roofs are solid or laminated wood or cross-laminated timber. There are certain dimensional requirements:
    • Columns – 8in (205mm) x 8in (205mm) if supporting floor, 6in (150mm) x 8in (205mm) if supporting roof
    • Beams – 6in (150mm) x 10in (255mm) if supporting floor, 4in x 6in (150mm) if supporting roof
    • Arches – Varies 8in (205mm) x 8in (205mm) to 4in (100mm) x 6in (150mm)
    • Floors – 3in (75mm) or 4in (100mm) thick
  • Type V: Structural elements, walls, arches, floors, and roofs are wood or other approved material. Most residential construction is Type V.
  1. First Digit (X00): Exterior bearing walls
  2. Second Digit (0X0): Columns, beams, girders, trusses and arches, supporting bearing walls, columns or loads from more than one floor.
  3. Third Digit (00X): Floor construction

Material Combustibility Outside of the construction type and fire resistance rating of the structural elements there are also different designations for what is considered a combustible material, limited combustible material and noncombustible material. Limited Combustible Material Material that is considered limited combustible needs to meet certain criteria.

  1. It needs to be able to produce a heat value less than 3,500 BTU/lb when tested in accordance with NFPA 259. (For context paper has a heat value of approximately 7,000 BTU/lb, wood is about 10,000 BTU/lb while most plastics are in the 15,000 to 22,000 BTU/lb range)
  2. Tested in accordance with ASTM E2965 at an incident heat flux of 75kW/m2 for 20 minutes and meet the following conditions.a. Peak heat release rate doesn’t exceed 150kW/m2 for more than 10 seconds b. Total heat released is less than 8MJ/m2
  3. Either one of the following a. Material has a noncombustible base with a surface that doesn’t have a flame spread index greater than 50 when tested in accordance with ASTM E84. The surface ontop of the noncombustible base can’t be thicker than 1/8th inch (3.2mm) b. Flame spread index is less than 25 when tested with ASTM E84 or UL 723, even if the material is cut.

An example of a limited combustible material is gypsum wallboard. Combustible Material Defining combustible materials is done so by process of elimination. If the materials don’t meet the definition of limited-combustible or noncombustible then it is a combustible material.

  1. A common example of a combustible material is untreated wood.
  2. Ensuring a building remains structurally sound and that materials react to fire predictably is important to overall life safety.
  3. Understanding and complying with construction type requirements is the first step in creating a safe built environment.

We gave some common examples of each type of construction, what are some other examples? Let me know in the comments below. Important Notice: Any opinion expressed in this column (blog, article) is the opinion of the author and does not necessarily represent the official position of NFPA or its Technical Committees. Brian O’Connor Technical Services Engineer OCTOBER 14, 2022 SEPTEMBER 16, 2022 MAY 27, 2022 MARCH 30, 2022 MARCH 22, 2022 DECEMBER 16, 2021

What is a Type 3 4 or 5 building?

Although many buildings look similar at first glance, the underlying materials affect their cost and durability — especially in an emergency. Building codes classify all structures from Type 1 to Type 5, and this building type reveals crucial information such as fire resistance.

  • Some modern buildings have become stronger and cheaper to build.
  • However, manufactured materials like engineered lumber and synthetic plastics burn easily, leading to fast collapses and additional hazards for firefighters.
  • The most fire-resistant buildings, Type 1 structures, are constructed with concrete and protected steel, which can withstand high temperatures without collapsing.

By contrast, Type 5 structures, the least fire-resistant, are lightweight and made of combustible materials that collapse soon after catching fire. In this post, we will cover all five construction types:

Type 1: Fire-resistive : High-rise buildings made of concrete and protected steel Type 2: Non-combustible : Newer buildings with tilt-slab or reinforced masonry walls and a metal roof Type 3: Ordinary : New or old buildings with non-combustible walls but a wood-framed roof Type 4: Heavy Timber : Older buildings made from thick lumber Type 5: Wood-framed : Modern buildings with combustible framing and roofs

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Read on to learn more about the five building construction types.

What are the 4 building types?

Most people would look at a building and view it as just that: a building. But as a contractor, you see buildings differently. Building elements like the structure, walls, floors, and roof are all telling of a building’s class. If you don’t already have a keen eye for those details, it’s important to know the five types of building construction.

What is a Type I building?

TYPE I: Fire-Resistive Made of poured concrete and steel. Steel members must have a fire protective coating. Type 1 structures are high-rises; defined as buildings more than 75 feet tall, with some agencies making amendments for buildings that are 35–55 feet tall.

What is G1 G2 G3 and G4 construction?

Construction- CIDB License If you wish to start a Construction related business, you have to apply CIDB license. The Construction Industry Development Board (“CIDB”) is an inescapable presence for those engaged in the construction industry within Malaysia, largely through the levy which it imposes on all major construction projects, and the compulsory courses which it conducts.

Registration of Contractors As per the Act, no person shall undertake any construction works unless he is registered and holds a valid certificate of registration issued by CIDB. Non-registration is an offence punishable by a fine not exceeding RM 50,000.00. Registration Term Registration of local contractors is time-based.

Local contractors are entitled to be registered, in particular categories such as Civil Engineering Construction, Building Construction and Mechanical and Electrical, for a minimum period of 1 year but not exceeding 3 years to perform construction works in Malaysia.

  • Restriction
  • A contractor is not allowed to execute any construction works outside his registered category.
  • Categories or Grades

There are 7 specified registration grades for each category as set out below and a contractor is not entitled to undertake any construction project which exceeds the value of the construction works specified in the registration grade. The registration fee payable to CIDB varies according to the registration grade.

  1. G1 Not exceeding 200,000
  2. G2 Not exceeding 500,000
  3. G3 Not exceeding 1 Million
  4. G4 Not exceeding 3 Million
  5. G5 Not exceeding 5 Million
  6. G6 Not exceeding 10 Million
  7. G7 No Limit
  8. Foreign Contractor Registration

Foreign contractors registration is project-based. The certificate of registration of a foreign contractor allows the holder to execute only the project specified in the certificate. The Foreigner contractor has to apply to CIDB for an extension of the validity of the certificate within 14 days before the expiry of the validity of the certificate.

LEVY ON CONTRACTORS A CIDB registered contractor is bound to notify the CIDB of any contract which he has executed having a contract sum of more than RM 500,000.00. The percentage of levy is calculated as 0.125 % of the contract sum by way of Regulation 2 of the Lembaga Pembangunan Industri Pembinaan Malaysia (Imposition of Levy) Order 2003 effective from 21.5.2003,

Fine on No-Notification If the contractor has not notified the CIDB regarding the contract executed in an amount more than RM500,0000, it’s an offence that shall on conviction be liable to a fine of RM 5,000.00. Further the amount of any levy payable may be recoverable as a civil debt due to CIDB.

What buildings are Type 1 construction?

Type I Construction: Fire Resistive – This category applies to any building that stands over 75 feet tall. This applies to all high-rise housing and commercial space. That includes apartment buildings, offices, and hotels. These buildings are designed to withstand high temperatures for a long time without collapsing.

Beyond that, all structural materials are non-combustible. Walls, floors, and roofs are constructed with reinforced concrete and protected steel. While these features make these buildings extremely durable, it also increases construction costs. Some Type 1 buildings have HVAC systems and self-pressurizing stairwells to prevent fires from spreading.

These building elements make it easier for firefighters to access and extinguish fires. When entering a Type 1 building, their main objective revolves around securing stairwells to ensure a safe evacuation.

What are the 3 types of buildings?

Detached Buildings. Semi-Detached Buildings. Multi-Storey or High Rise Buildings.

How are buildings classified?

Building Classifications – According to the Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA), there are three classifications a building can be given. These classifications are Class A, Class B, and Class C. Let’s explore the lowest classified buildings to the highest classified buildings.

What are the main construction types?

Construction projects fall into three broad categories: Buildings and houses. Public works. Industrial projects.

What are Type A and Type B buildings?

A or B is protected or unprotected – You can have protected or unprotected construction irrespective of fire suppression. “Type A” buildings are ambitious, rigidly organized, highly status-conscious, sensitive, impatient, anxious, proactive, and concerned with time management.

Type B” buildings live at a lower stress level and typically work steadily, enjoying achievement but not becoming stressed when they do not achieve. They may be creative and enjoy exploring ideas and concepts. They are often reflective. all buildings have a little A-ness somewhere JeromeS is correct. But SneakyPete is right.

See table 601 of the 2006 IBC. Not certain what table it is in 2009. Hourly ratings for walls, floors, etc Nothing to do with sprinklers unless footnote e applies For the life of me, I still can’t find it. Ive read all of chapter 5 multiple times. Is there somewhere that specifically says A= protected B= unprotected? Please hurry.

  • I’m running out of lives!!! told you, page 89 ibc 2009, table 601 That is because you want it to be that simplified.
  • The code does not state protected or unprotected.
  • It gives you several tables.
  • The first that you should look at is in chapter 5 for allowable height and building areas.
  • Then look at chapter 6 for fire resistance rating requirements.

So if you have a restaurant and it is 7000 sq. ft. you cant be a type 5b building, unless you either have an area modification due to frontage increases and sprinkler systems. So then you need to go to a type 5a building and you go to chapter 6 and find table 601 which gives you your fire ratings.

Table 601 shows “0” for the req’d rating for all the B line items and shows “1” for most the A line items (with a footnote to allow sprinklers instead in many cases) Difference between A an B is nothing more than time. New to this forum and hadn’t figured out how to edit but just wanted to add that sprinkler designations are found in 903.

You might be looking for Table 508.3.3 (required separation of occupancies) in IBC 2006. It shows mixed occupancy separations utilizing sprinklered vs non-sprinklered. The two broad categories, A and B, are based on the inherent fire resistance of the material and the degree of fire protection applied over the structural member.

What is H4 building?

The requirements in this edition of Approved Document H are as follows: – H1 – Foul water drainage (1) An adequate system of drainage shall be provided to carry foul water from appliances within the building to one of the following, listed in order of priority: (a) a public sewer; or, where that is not reasonably practicable, (b) a private sewer communicating with a public sewer; or, where that is not reasonably practicable, (c) either a septic tank which has an appropriate form of secondary treatment or another wastewater treatment system; or, where that is not reasonably practicable, (d) a cesspool.

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2) In this Part ‘foul water’ means waste water which comprises or includes: (a) waste from a sanitary convenience, bidet or appliance used for washing receptacles for foul waste; or (b) water which has been used for food preparation, cooking or washing. Limits on application Requirement H1 does not apply to the diversion of water which has been used for personal washing or for the washing of clothes, linen or other articles to collection systems for re-use.

H2 – Wastewater treatment systems and cesspools (1) Any septic tank and its form of secondary treatment, other wastewater treatment system or cesspool, shall be so sited and constructed that: (a) it is not prejudicial to the health of any person; (b) it will not contaminate any watercourse, underground water or water supply; (c) there are adequate means of access for emptying and maintenance; and (d) where relevant, it will function to a sufficient standard for the protection of health in the event of a power failure.

(2) Any septic tank, holding tank which is part of a wastewater treatment system or cesspool shall be : (a) of adequate capacity; (b) so constructed that it is impermeable to liquids; and (c) adequately ventilated. (3) Where a foul water drainage system from a building discharges to a septic tank, wastewater treatment system or cesspool, a durable notice shall be affixed in a suitable place in the building containing information on any continuing maintenance required to avoid risks to health.

Limits on application None H3 – Rainwater drainage (1) Adequate provision shall be made for rainwater to be carried from the roof of the building. (2) Paved areas around the building shall be so constructed as to be adequately drained. (3) Rainwater from a system provided pursuant to sub-paragraphs (1) or (2) shall discharge to one of the following, listed in order of priority: (a) an adequate soakaway or some other adequate infiltration system; or, where that is not reasonably practicable, (b) a watercourse; or, where that is not reasonably practicable, (c) a sewer.

Limits on application Requirement H3(2) applies only to paved areas: (a) which provide access to the building pursuant to requirement M1 (access and use of buildings other than dwellings), or requirement M2 (access to extensions to buildings other than dwellings), or requirement M4(1), (2) or (3) (access to and use of dwellings); (b) which provide access to or from a place of storage pursuant to paragraph H6(2) (solid waste storage); or (c) in any passage giving access to the building, where this is intended to be used in common by the occupiers of one or more other buildings.

Requirement H3(3) does not apply to the gathering of rainwater for re-use. H4 – Building over sewers (1) The erection or extension of a building or work involving the underpinning of a building shall be carried out in a way that is not detrimental to the building or building extension or to the continued maintenance of the drain, sewer or disposal main.

  1. 2) In this paragraph ‘disposal main’ means any pipe, tunnel or conduit used for the conveyance of effluent to or from a sewage disposal works, which is not a public sewer.
  2. 3) In this paragraph and paragraph H5 ‘map of sewers’ means any records kept by a sewerage undertaker under section 199 of the Water Industry Act 1991.1991 c.56; Section 199 was amended by Section 97 of the Water Act 2003 (c.37).

Limits on application Requirement H4 applies only to work carried out: (a) over a drain, sewer or disposal main which is shown on any map of sewers; or (b) on any site or in such a manner as may result in interference with the use of, or obstruction of the access of any person to, any drain, sewer or disposal main which is shown on any map of sewers.

  1. H5 – Separate systems of drainage Any system for discharging water to a sewer which is provided pursuant to paragraph H3 shall be separate from that provided for the conveyance of foul water from the building.
  2. Limits on application Requirement H5 applies only to a system provided in connection with the erection or extension of a building where it is reasonably practicable for the system to discharge directly or indirectly to a sewer for the separate conveyance of surface water which is: (a) shown on a map of sewers; or (b) under construction either by the sewerage undertaker or by some other person (where the sewer is the subject of an agreement to make a declaration of vesting pursuant to section 104 of the Water Industry Act 1991).

Section 104 was amended by Section 96 of the Schedule 9 to the Water Act 2003 and is prospectively amended by Section 42 of the Flood and Water management Act 2010 (c.29). H6 – Solid waste storage (1) Adequate provision shall be made for storage of solid waste.

2) Adequate means of access shall be provided: (a) for people in the building to the place of storage; and (b) from the place of storage to a collection point (where one has been specified by the waste collection authority under section 46 (household waste) or section 47 (commercial waste) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 (*) or to a street (where no collection point has been specified).

(*) 1990 c.43; Section 46 was amended by Section 19 of the London Local Authorities Act 2007 (2007 c. ii) and Section 47 was amended by Section 21 of that Act. Section 46 was also amended by Section 76 and Schedule 5 to the Climate Change Act 2008 (c.28).

What is Type 2 building material?

Product details Our Type 2 is a crushed aggregate with extra dusts and fines, which makes the perfect sub base for a range of domestic and commercial construction projects. Graded to 50mm down to dust and fines no specified grading, it is finer than our MOT Type 1 sub base, as it is composed of fewer larger angular scalpings.

What is frame construction type?

1. Frame (Class 1): Buildings where the exterior walls are wood or other combustible materials, including construction where combustible materials are combined with other materials (such as brick veneer, stone veneer, wood iron-clad, stucco on wood).

How many types of buildings are classified?

Types of Buildings: – Buildings are usually used for various needs such as shelter, industrial and many more. Buildings are categorized according to the need. Buildings are classified into nine types based on occupancy are as follows,

Residential BuildingsEducational BuildingsBusiness BuildingsIndustrial BuildingsAssembly BuildingsInstitutional BuildingsStorage BuildingsMercantile BuildingsHazardous Buildings

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What is Property construction type?

For more important real estate insights, download our e-book ! – When it comes to insurance for the real estate industry, the largest exposure you face is the property. Underwriters that evaluate new risks are doing their due diligence to make sure they’re working with a company that values proper maintenance, risk transference, etc.

  1. Frame
  2. Joisted Masonry
  3. Non-Cumbustible
  4. Masonry Non-Combustible
  5. Modified Fire Resistive
  6. Fire Resistive

Insurance Services Office Inc. (ISO) grades buildings based on what would happen with your properties in the event of a loss. For example, if you have a building that’s “frame” construction you’ll typically see a higher rate than “masonry” or a “fire resistive” building.

  • Buildings with exterior walls, floors and roofs of combustible material – typically wood. Masonry veneer (brick-face) or metal clad don’t change the construction class.
  • Frame is easy to build and economical, but burns quickly and easily. It has concealed spaces where fire can continue.
  • Least desirable class for underwriters.
  • Examples: Habitational 3-4 stories max.
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ISO Class 2- Joisted Masonry

  • Buildings with exterior walls of masonry or fire-resistive construction rated for not less than one hour and with combustible floors and roofs. This typically includes block constructed buildings and can include heavy timber buildings.
  • Harder to ignite, and burns at a slower rate. There are fewer concealed spaces than frame construction and a higher rebuild rate based on less damage.
  • Examples: Habitational, small office or retail.3-4 stories max.

ISO Class 3- Non-Combustible

  • Buildings with exterior walls, floors and roofs of noncombustible or slow-burning materials.
  • Easy to erect, economical to build and uses materials that don’t easily burn.
  • Typically steel construction. Can easily lose strength under high temperatures, typically seen in fires.
  • Examples: Warehouses and manufacturing facilities.

ISO Class 4- Masonry Non-Combustible

  • Buildings with walls made of masonry, consisting of concrete block, reinforced masonry and can be combined with steel framing.
  • Roof construction is typically made of heavy steel.
  • No wood framing in the roof which helps keep the structure standing in a large loss. Walls are a minimum of 1 hour fire resistive.
  • Examples: Shopping centers, office buildings, warehouses and schools.

ISO Class 5- Modified Fire Resistive

  • Building construction consists of fire resistive materials such as masonry and protected steel materials not less than 4″ thick.
  • Fire resistive less than 2 hours, but greater than 1 hour.
  • Roofing deck is heavy steel frame with concrete poured on steel deck or pre-poured concrete.
  • Examples: High and mid-rise office buildings, apartments and condo buildings.

ISO Class 6- Fire Resistive

  • Fire resistive for not less than 2 hours for walls, floors and roofs.
  • Typical wall construction is masonry at a minimum of 4 inches thick, hollow masonry is a minimum of 8 inches thick.
  • Floors and roofs are a minimum of 4 inches thick and fire resistant a minimum of 2 hours.
  • Reinforced concrete of frame or steel are well protected and are also a minimum of 4 inches thick for walls, roof and floors.
  • Examples: High-rise office buildings, condos and parking garages.

When building new properties or acquiring properties, it’s important to keep in mind how they’ll be rated and if it will fit within an insurance carrier’s underwriting guidelines. For more information, reach out to the Real Estate ‘ A’ team ! Related Resources

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What are the characteristics of type 4 construction buildings?

Weaknesses: –

Interior structural members vulnerable to fire involvement Fire spread potential through concealed spaces Susceptible to water damage Walls can retain heat

How To Find Construction Type Of Building Classic Type IV Construction How To Find Construction Type Of Building A Modern Type IV Building Courtesy of APA – The Engineered Wood Association Also known as heavy timber construction, Type IV construction has exterior walls made of noncombustible materials (masonry). Interior structural members, including beams, columns, arches, floors and roofs are made of solid or laminated wood with no concealed spaces.

This wood must have dimensions large enough to be considered heavy timber. These dimensions vary depending on the particular code being used. Heavy Timber construction was used extensively in old factories, mills and warehouses. Traditional Heavy Timber construction is rarely used today in new construction except for decorative reasons.

The use of Heavy Timber construction with glue-lam beams is growing. The primary fire hazard associated with Heavy Timber construction is the massive amount of combustible contents presented by the structural timbers in addition to the contents of the building.

What are the 3 types of buildings?

Detached Buildings. Semi-Detached Buildings. Multi-Storey or High Rise Buildings.

Is there an app to identify buildings?

LABYL – Learn About Buildings You Love Inspired by the Shazam app for music, LABYL or “Learn About Buildings You Love” is an architectural mobile application that allows users to identify buildings that interest them, simply by taking a photo of the structure with their phone.

The app is designed to pair the user’s picture to images in the database. Users whose interests are piqued from the instantaneous architectural discovery can further explore the neighborhood for similar buildings. The app automatically pulls up your location and you can explore buildings around you. It also provides external links to city agencies, developers, architects, and real estate listings.

You can take a picture of a building and the app will identify the building. We also crowdsource information by allowing users to add buildings to the database. Our information is collated from city records and the NYC open data platform. You can look up a building based on your location or simply search by address.

What is a Class 2 or 3 building?

Class 2 buildings may also be single storey attached dwellings with a common space below. For example, 2 dwellings above a common basement or carpark. Class 3 buildings. Class 3 applies to residential buildings other than Class 1 or Class 2 buildings, or a Class 4 part of a building.

What are Type A and Type B buildings?

A or B is protected or unprotected – You can have protected or unprotected construction irrespective of fire suppression. “Type A” buildings are ambitious, rigidly organized, highly status-conscious, sensitive, impatient, anxious, proactive, and concerned with time management.

  1. Type B” buildings live at a lower stress level and typically work steadily, enjoying achievement but not becoming stressed when they do not achieve.
  2. They may be creative and enjoy exploring ideas and concepts.
  3. They are often reflective.
  4. All buildings have a little A-ness somewhere JeromeS is correct.
  5. But SneakyPete is right.

See table 601 of the 2006 IBC. Not certain what table it is in 2009. Hourly ratings for walls, floors, etc Nothing to do with sprinklers unless footnote e applies For the life of me, I still can’t find it. Ive read all of chapter 5 multiple times. Is there somewhere that specifically says A= protected B= unprotected? Please hurry.

I’m running out of lives!!! told you, page 89 ibc 2009, table 601 That is because you want it to be that simplified. The code does not state protected or unprotected. It gives you several tables. The first that you should look at is in chapter 5 for allowable height and building areas. Then look at chapter 6 for fire resistance rating requirements.

So if you have a restaurant and it is 7000 sq. ft. you cant be a type 5b building, unless you either have an area modification due to frontage increases and sprinkler systems. So then you need to go to a type 5a building and you go to chapter 6 and find table 601 which gives you your fire ratings.

  • Table 601 shows “0” for the req’d rating for all the B line items and shows “1” for most the A line items (with a footnote to allow sprinklers instead in many cases) Difference between A an B is nothing more than time.
  • New to this forum and hadn’t figured out how to edit but just wanted to add that sprinkler designations are found in 903.

You might be looking for Table 508.3.3 (required separation of occupancies) in IBC 2006. It shows mixed occupancy separations utilizing sprinklered vs non-sprinklered. The two broad categories, A and B, are based on the inherent fire resistance of the material and the degree of fire protection applied over the structural member.