How To Make An Eco Brick?

How To Make An Eco Brick
How do you make an EcoBrick? – –

Collect your clean and dry household waste. We recommend only waste that you cannot recycle (like dog food bags), but you can EcoBrick anything non-biodegradable and dry. Twist your waste and insert it into a plastic bottle. Compress it as tightly as you can with a stick. Keep doing this – make sure your bottle is unsquishable. Think your EcoBrick is done? If you can squeeze it by more than 10% with one hand you should add more waste. No longer squishable? It’s done!

Making EcoBricks is not about encouraging the production of plastic, but rather a temporary means of protecting the environment while us humans figure out a way to cut plastic out of our lives altogether, and while you figure out how to cut these items out of your own life.

  • EcoBricking is simply a case of forming a habit – rather than throwing your wrapper in the bin, just stuff it into a disposable bottle that you keep next to your sink or bin.
  • Many projects have a preferred bottle size preference so please contact any project you would like to support before you start EcoBricking.

But, you can always make oddly shaped EcoBricks for personal projects. This is an easy way to make a small impact. If you would like more information about EcoBricks, projects that you can support and what types of items are and aren’t recycleable, check out the,

What is needed to make an eco brick?

There’s more plastic in the ocean than ever before, but plastic production isn’t slowing down. Over 99% of plastics come from chemicals sourced from oil and gas production – contributing massively to climate change. There are lots of easy ways you can cut down your single-use plastic, but what should you do with the plastic that you can’t avoid? Ecobricks are one solution.

What type of plastic can be used to make ecobricks?

This article is about the plastic construction block. For other uses, see Eco-Brick, Ecobricks are plastic drinking bottles packed with non-biodegradable waste to make a reusable building block. An ecobrick is a plastic bottle packed with used plastic to a set density. They serve as reusable building blocks. Ecobricks can be used to produce various items, including furniture, garden walls and other structures.

  • Ecobricks are produced primarily as a means of managing consumed plastic by sequestering it and containing it safely, by terminally reducing the net surface area of the packed plastic to effectively secure the plastic from degrading into toxins and microplastics,
  • Ecobricking is a both an individual and collaborative endeavour.

The ecobricking movement promotes the personal ecobricking process as a means to raise awareness of the consequences of consumption and the dangers of plastic. It also promotes the collaborative process as a means to encourage communities to take collective responsibility for their used plastic and to use it to produce a useful product.

  1. Typically, producers use a wood or bamboo stick to manually pack plastic into the plastic bottle.
  2. Any size of transparent polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic bottle can be used to make an ecobrick.
  3. The bottle and the packed plastic are clean and dry to prevent the growth of bacteria.
  4. Plastic is cut or ripped into small pieces then packed little by little, alternating between adding the plastic and compacting it, layer by layer.

The bottle is rotated with each press to ensure the plastic is evenly compacted throughout the bottle. This helps prevent voids and allows the packing to reach the requisite solidity needed for building block applications. Completed ecobricks are packed solid enough that they can bear the weight of a person without deforming—a density range between 0.33 g/ml and 0.7 g/ml. “Take a Plastic Bottle – Stuff it Full of plastic” Ecobrick.it

How long do eco bricks last?

🟢 Next Life – Well-used ecobrick modules will last 2-3 years. After this time, the silicone joints began to weaken and to fail. Ecobricks also begin to loose their lustre as the colors of the contained plastic begin to fade. This is a good opportunity to transition them to long term building applications where they are fully protected with earth.

How long do eco bricks burn?

Description – These bricks are made out of the wood waste residuals from a hardwood manufacturing facility that works in primarily Oak, Hickory, and Maple. These bricks are around 5% moisture content (3 times lower than year-seasoned firewood) and therefore spend less energy boiling off water.

  1. The result is a BTU output unmatched by any other firewood product out there.
  2. If you can damper down the flu of your stove, these babies will keep you with hot coals the entire night.
  3. Gone are the days of getting up at 2 a.m.
  4. To stoke and feed the stove.
  5. Some highly efficient stoves get up to 12 hours of heat from these bricks! Each pallet comes with 96 6-packs of bricks for a total of 576 bricks.

Each 6-pack weighs just over 20lbs meaning each brick is over 3lbs in weight. This is the ideal size to ensure a hot burn that lasts much longer than the smaller 2lbs bricks; just ask anyone who has burned those smaller bricks. Extremely economical, each one-ton pallet of Enviro-Bricks is equivalent to one cord of wood, but takes up half the amount of space.

  1. They are also 100% hardwood meaning that they are food safe to cook with on your next camping adventure! As an added bonus, since all the wood has been kiln dried prior to production there are no insects you are bringing into your home once you receive your delivery.
  2. Nor is there any threat of transferring invasive species such as the Emerald Ash Borer as a result.

Toss in that these bricks are carbon neutral as a heat source and you just simply cover all the bases here.

Are eco bricks a good idea?

Conclusion – Ecobricks certainly offer a ready-made solution to the immediate problems posed by plastic. They are a hugely powerful tool for cleaning up local areas, educating schools and communities, and creating structures that will stand the test of time.

Who invented ecobricks?

Eco Bricks – A revolutionary way of upcycling everyday plastics How To Make An Eco Brick (Image Credit-Josephine Chan & Ian Christie) Let’s be real! We are nowhere close to reducing our plastic consumption. The Covid-19 pandemic has made giving up single use plastics even more difficult than before. While we are trying to figure out ways to eliminate plastic from our daily lives, what can we do about the ones that we have already used and still exist in our world? Are you thinking about recycling? Well guess what.

  1. Not all kinds of plastics can be recycled.
  2. Like that packet of chips you just ate, cannot be recycled.
  3. The cup of coffee that you so happily bought from Starbucks cannot be recycled either.
  4. Tissues, plastic bags, plastic gift wraps and straws the list is endless.
  5. So what can we do? We believe the answer is Upcycling! And one really interesting way to upcycle already existing everyday plastic lying around us is through Eco Bricks.

An Eco brick is a plastic bottle packed to a set density with used plastic. It’s created by filling a plastic bottle with dry plastic until it’s packed tightly and can be used as a building block. Made of non-biodegradable plastics, Ecobricks will never break down and hence is the greenest solution to build permanent structures from buildings to furniture – which makes them a great way to reduce the plastic waste sent to landfill, extend the life of plastics manufactured for single use and build more affordable infrastructure from pre-existing materials. How To Make An Eco Brick (Image Credits: Greenpop Organisation) History The story of EcoBricks starts in Guatemala, and takes us, via the Philippines, to South Africa. Susanna Heisse, an environmental activist in Guatemala developed the first construction system with Eco bricks in 2003 for solving plastic pollution challenges faced in Lake Atitlan communities.

She built a wall out of them, which became an inspiration to others around the world. This led to one of the first towns in South Africa called Greyton to design schools, community gardens and an eco village based on this concept. Later Ian Dommisse, an architect based in Port Elizabeth got so highly inspired that he started an EcoBrick Exchange, a network of local business partners who are happy to offer storage space and discounts in exchange for EcoBricks, as well as community swap shops, where second hand items of value are exchanged for EcoBricks.

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“It’s such a transforming act. When you see how much plastic goes into one bottle and you see how much plastic is in your daily lifethe idea is that the habit makes you more conscious of your daily footprint.” – Ian Dommisse Advantages of Ecobricks –

  • Plastics are durable in nature hence eco bricks provide longevity.
  • As you know plastics remain the same for 1000 years or more, hence eco bricks will never break down.
  • By nature, plastic is water resistant so whatever you make out of eco bricks, it will be safe from water.
  • Seeing blocks and buildings around you made out of basically rubbish becomes a source of inspiration for everyone to reduce their plastic waste.
  • All this plastic would otherwise end up in our oceans, Eco bricks prevent that from happening.
  • A lot of plastic waste is burnt which in turn creates pollution so eco bricks in a way help reduce global warming.
  • If thrown away, plastics break down into micro plastics. Eco bricks helps to reduce the harmful effects of plastic degradation.
  • Ecobricks is a low energy solution to plastic waste as it doesn’t demand technology or funds. It can be made anywhere by anyone with the basic abilities and some waste in hand.

Make your own Ecobrick – Ecobricks are very simple to make and you can start making yours by simply collecting a few plastic bottles, preferably of the same size and follow the steps.

  1. Collect, clean and dry plastic waste at home. Items such as foil, cling wrap or any other non-recyclables will be sure to fill up your Eco brick.
  2. Compress waste into a plastic bottle with a stick. An old-fashioned wooden spoon handle does the trick.
  3. Pack tightly after every level to ensure the waste is properly compacted.
  4. Squeeze the bottle with your hand to check if it’s tight and full enough or tries standing on it to see if it holds your weight.
  5. Seal tightly with the bottle top! And now you’re ready to use your Eco Brick.

How To Make An Eco Brick Get started today. Turn your next bottle into an Eco Brick and see how that changes the way you think about waste. : Eco Bricks – A revolutionary way of upcycling everyday plastics

How are plastic bricks made?

by Meta Gewald A brick, one of the building blocks of society, made from our waste. It almost sounds too good to be true, Nzambi Matee from Nairobi, Kenya is the inventor of the plastic brick. Contrary to what you may expect, the plastic bricks are twice as sturdy as concrete, the performance is optimized.

  • The bricks consist of mixture of sand and plastics.
  • The sand and plastic are mixed at very high temperatures and are then compressed into bricks.
  • Matee is a materials engineer that combined her intellectual knowledge with real world action and delivered a simple and sustainable product.
  • Seeing all the plastic bags everywhere and other plastic waste polluting her country she became both frustrated (as the most of us do) and motivated.

Now Matee is the founder of Gjenge Makers, Nairobi, where they produce the plastic bricks. The factory produces around 1500 bricks a day out of a mix of different plastics. This blog describes why I believe that this innovation could be considered as a frugal innovation. Mixing of plastics, Source: Gjenge Makers What aspects makes this an innovation frugal? Two aspects stand out. This innovation promotes a circular economy and is very much affordable. As said earlier the bricks are a mix of sand, higher density plastics, received from factory waste, and lower density plastics, received from other recyclers.

  • Gjenge Makers accepts waste that other facilities can not recycle, such as plastic milk and shampoo bottles, sandwich bags, buckets and ropes.
  • There is that waste they cannot process anymore; they cannot recycle.
  • That is what we get,” Matee told Reuters,
  • Thus, the plastic bricks provide a use for factory waste and ensures it is recycled.

Lower density plastics are bought from local recyclers. This leads to the promotion of recycling in the local environment and provides jobs. Plastic that used to be valued as trash and would have been trash for hundreds of years is now turned into a simple high-quality product. Nzambi Matee utilized her innovative engineering skills to convert plastic waste into building materials, credits Designboom Another reason why I would say this innovation is indeed a frugal innovation is it’s price. The bricks sell at 850 Kenyan shillings, $7,70, per square meter which make them cheaper than normal bricks.

  • Since it is made from waste the material, costs are very low.
  • This also translates into a low product price.
  • Matee made sure the bricks are affordable to Kenyan citizens.
  • Moreover, it is produced in Kenya and is not reliant on importations.
  • Besides this bringing the price down, it also involves the community.

Genje Makers produces locally. The start-up serves as a job provider, especially for youth groups and women. They help the community by providing affordable and available bricks that can help in the making of houses, schools, roads etcetera. Which in their place provide education, easier access to health and shelter to people.

  1. The product is also not overengineered or overdesigned.
  2. Everything that is necessary in a brick is there and as mentioned earlier, it is even stronger than concrete.
  3. According to Weyrauch and Herstatt something is a frugal innovation if it leads to substantial cost reduction, concentration on core functionalities and optimized performance.

Matee’s bricks easily meet these criteria. Furthermore, the start-up and production connects a community and promotes a circular economy. One of the few concerns I have is that overtime microplastics may come from the bricks into the soil. It would be interesting to read or hear more about this aspect.

  1. If this blog story spiked your interest, please watch the below video and join the conversation about frugal innovation, frugal building materials and/or microplastics on LinkedIn,
  2. What are frugal innovations? In this blog series we publish 10 examples from all over the world, written by our Students and Ambassadors from the minor Frugal Innovation for Sustainable Global Development.

Stay Frugally tuned for more blogs and join the conversation on LinkedIn,

Are eco bricks cheaper?

So, Which One Should You Pick? – Standard bricks are the go-to option for most construction projects. Regular bricks are durable, fire-resistant, and can be used in numerous applications. But, of course, hollow blocks and ecobricks have their specific uses and should not be discounted.

Hollow blocks are an excellent choice for exterior applications as they’re lightweight and can help keep any construction cool during summer. They are also often designed to be moisture-resistant, making them a practical option for bathrooms and kitchens. However, the fact that they’re inexpensive makes hollow blocks such a popular choice of material.

You can save a few bucks on construction costs as you require less material to achieve the same results. Ecobricks are an excellent choice for people looking to be more environmentally friendly. These bricks are made from recycled materials, so you can rest assured you aren’t draining more resources from the Earth.

Is eco brick eco friendly?

What is an Ecobrick? – An Ecobrick is essentially a reusable building block created by solid non-biodegradable waste placed into a plastic bottle to a set density. By packing the bottles with a set density, it makes them suitable building blocks for virtually any construction.

They can also be packed with other non-biological un-recyclables that, uncontained, are toxic to the environment (i.e. styrofoam, wires, small batteries, etc.). Ecobricks are a sustainable way to reuse non-biodegradable plastic waste as plastic waste is regarded as a long-lasting and durable material.

Hence, keeping plastic out of the ecosystem and prevents the contamination of the environment. Ecobricks are used to make many things such as furniture, walls and buildings. It allows communities and companies to get control of their plastic waste to create modular furniture, garden spaces, walls and even full-scale buildings.

Are ecobricks flammable?

Ecobrick Fire Safety – Ecobricks.org Dear Amanda, Thank you for your question. The issue of ecobrick fire safety is an important one– and rightly so as plastic releases toxic fumes when it burns. However, the risk of ecobrick flamability is often overestimated due to misconceptions of how ecobricks are used.

  1. Traditional bricks and ecobricks are not the same thing, and they are used in very different ways.
  2. I use ecobricks for my garden and my furniture and I am honestly more concerned about my traditional furniture catching fire! So let’s take a look at the issues caFoamAs we all know, plastic in the wrong place is,

Especially if it is in a fire! When plastic burns it releases all sorts of nasty chemicals and fumes. And so too when it degrades in, The goal of from degradation is the reason we are ecobricking aterall! Likewise, this is the same pursuit when building with ecobricks.

The GEA has thus developed best practices for making ecobricks and for building with ecobricks so that our constructions safely and securely contain the ecobricks for a long long time. Of course, it is helpful to remember that given the right conditions, everything burns. When we build with wood we do so attentive to the various properties of wood and the conditions in which it will start to burn.

When we build with ecobricks we do the same: we build in ways that minimize or even completely remove the risk of fire. An ecobrick that is densely packed is solid plastic and very difficult to set a light. The first step in fire safety is ensuring that the ecobricks that you use are packed to the proper density. The GEA is to pack ecobricks to the minimum density of 0.33g/ml.

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This means a minimum of 200g for a 600ml bottle, and 500g for a 1.5ml bottle. By packing the ecobrick tight to these specifications, the amount of oxygen in the bottle is minimized. This makes it much more difficult for an ecobrick to catch on fire, than say a bottle loosely packed with plastic. In fact, a properly packed ecobrick is almost impossible to light on fire! Engineers test material flammability by holding it to an exposed flame.

Foam or polyester lining with catch fire in a few seconds. Try holding a densely packed ecobrick to a flame. It won’t catch fire for more than 30 seconds. In this way, a module made of densely packed ecobricks is far less flammable than an upholstered foam or Dacron filled mattress or couch! The second step is ensuring that you are building properly with your ecobricks.

The GEA’s recommended building method is with, In this way, ecobricks are laid horizontally in cob (a mix of clay, sand and organic binder). For foundation, the ecobricks are half laid in cement and half in cob. There is typically a 3-5cm space of cob mortar between the bottles. When walls are built this way, they are virtually impossible to set on fire.

Cob walls have been known to stay intact long after wood beams and wood floors have turned to ash. For absolute fire safety, you can opt to cover the exposed caps and bottoms with an earthen or cement render. Our colleagues in South Africa have done some experiments with ecobrick earthen walls and fire.

You can see the results of their tests here A A Travellingtoes production fimed by Tarryn Jolly – ” This is our 3hrs burn on timelapse. Take a look & see for yourself I’ll dig away the bottom of the wall where the fire was concentrated & we’ll inspect the bricks together. The wall at the base baked hard and clay like in the fire, the back of the wall (out of vew of the camera- was also kept burning) but was not hosed down till all the cob plopped off so the ecobrick “reveal” will be easier; less mud to clear”,

Finally, please note that contrary to popular assumption, the vast majority of ecobrick applications are for non-structural applications – like gardens bedding, playgrounds, and outdoor benches. These applications not only have extremely low flamability, the risks of their catching fire (i.e. Earth and Ecobrick garden bench are an easy application that reduces fire risk to nil. The are small, outdoor, and non-structural. The vast majority of ecobrickers put their ecobricks to use as densily packed, small scale or as green spaces. Modular applications, have a low flamability compared to traditional furniture.

  1. With outdoor, their flamability is almost nil and the dangers of their catching fire is minimal (),
  2. Thank you again for your question.
  3. Thinking about the potential end-life of our ecobrick in fire, is an essential part of,
  4. It is a good reminder of why we are ecobricking in the first place: Plastic can be toxic and dangerous! We thus take responsibility for it and inside an ecobrick.

When it comes to building with ecobricks, we are doing the same thing. We want to build in such a way that the ecobricks are safe and secured indefinitely from all forms of degradation — especially fire — so that years, or decades, or centuries from now, the ecobricks can be taken out, and put to good use Depending on the type of plastic being burned and the temperature, carbon dioxide, dioxins, carbon monoxide and various trace toxins are released. How To Make An Eco Brick When putting your ecobricks to use there are some simple guidelines to keep them fire safe.

Avoid wrapping them in flamable materialsAvoid taping your ecobricks togetherAvoid using low density ecobricksAvoid using empty bottles along side ecobricksFollow the GEA guidelines on recommended ecobrick applications

How To Make An Eco Brick One of the core concepts of ecobricking is to secure plastic inside a bottle and inside a construction to keep it from degrading (or burning!) for the next thousand years. : Ecobrick Fire Safety – Ecobricks.org

Why don’t we use plastic bricks?

But These Bricks Are Setting The World Alight, Aren’t They? – That’s just so true. Plastic is highly flammable. Plastic that’s on fire, even from just a smouldering cigarette end, releases poisonous toxins into the air. A smouldering bottle-brick will crack, releasing even more combustible material – a huge fire risk.

What are the disadvantages of plastic bricks?

Compression problems – One of the drawbacks of these type of bricks is that they can’t be used like standard bricks because the plastic compresses under heavy structural loads. However, their saving grace is that because of their awesome sound and thermal insulating properties, they make superb wall fillers. How To Make An Eco Brick The bricks are easy to use for construction (image courtesy of ByFusion) According to the ByFusion website, ByBlocks are perfect for non-load-bearing walls, retaining walls and walls that require soundproofing. Also, because of the flexible nature of plastic, they’re ideally suited to earthquake zones too or you can simply just use them for making durable, long-lasting fences.

  1. Gregor says: “RePlast blocks have incredible thermal characteristics in terms of sound and heat transfer.
  2. We envisage using them with normal building frames as fill.
  3. Our initial testing shows that they blow traditional cement blocks out of the water”.
  4. The company’s RePlast blocks (ByBlocks) can also be used to and are great for small community projects too.

He adds: “In theory, we’re looking at an absolute definition of a circular economy, whereby plastic waste washing up in local communities gets processed and used in local community centres or on roadways”. About Us We’re a professional skip hire company covering most of Sussex including, and,

Can plastic bottles be used as bricks?

This story was updated in January 2021. Bottle Bricks are a simple and accessible technology that can transform everyday plastic materials into a useful building material — plastic bottles stuffed full of trash until they are as compact as bricks. Bottle Bricks are known widely as “EcoBricks” or “EcoLadrillos” in Spanish and have also been called “Portable Landfill Devices.” Bottle Bricks have been used to build houses, school buildings, and other structures for well over a decade in Latin America and they are now increasingly being used around the world as a viable way to clean up the environment, prevent plastic pollution, and create a much-needed building material.

The process is incredibly simple — collect dry inorganic waste material (plastic bags, plastic wrappers, twist ties, etc.) and stuff it into a clean plastic bottle with a wooden stick or spoon. The more you stuff, the more plastic you will divert from the landfill or clean up out of the environment, and the stronger your bottle brick will be! This How-to will explore some tips on how to make an excellent bottle brick; how to collect a large number of bottle bricks for a project; and share some ideas about different structures or projects you could build using your finished bottles.

Our modern trashcans are way too big – throw away your trashcan and replace it with a bottle! Bottle brick spiral, courtesy of earthbench.org

How much does it cost to make an ecobrick?

Are Eco-Bricks Cheaper Than Tiles? – Eco-bricks are made from recycled plastic bottles which don’t require firing, lowering production costs by 30%, In addition, the cost of eco-brick materials is less than tiles and they are easier and faster to install, so the cost of labor is also lower.

Hence, eco-bricks are typically cheaper than tiles. To make one eco-brick, you need approximately 20 plastic bottles. The cost of 20 plastic bottles varies depending on where you live and the type of bottle you use, but it generally falls between $0.50 and $0.70 per bottle. So, the total cost of materials for one eco-brick is between $0.50 and $0.70.

On the other hand, tiles are made from various materials, including clay, sand, water, and minerals. Therefore, the cost of tiles varies widely depending on the type of tile you choose and where you purchase them. However, you can expect to pay somewhere between $0.50 and $15 per square foot of tile.

What is the most eco-friendly brick?

When compared to many other facing materials such as so-called concrete bricks, plastics, glass and others, natural clay brick remains one of the most eco-friendly, flexible, cost effective and beautiful materials used in construction. Click here for more.

What is the price of eco bricks?

Eco bricks: Rs 4 to 5 per piece.

How long can plastic bricks last?

Based on those measurements, it would take an estimated 100 to 1,300 years to completely break down a single LEGO block.

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What are inside eco bricks?

Eco Bricks – A revolutionary way of upcycling everyday plastics How To Make An Eco Brick (Image Credit-Josephine Chan & Ian Christie) Let’s be real! We are nowhere close to reducing our plastic consumption. The Covid-19 pandemic has made giving up single use plastics even more difficult than before. While we are trying to figure out ways to eliminate plastic from our daily lives, what can we do about the ones that we have already used and still exist in our world? Are you thinking about recycling? Well guess what.

  • Not all kinds of plastics can be recycled.
  • Like that packet of chips you just ate, cannot be recycled.
  • The cup of coffee that you so happily bought from Starbucks cannot be recycled either.
  • Tissues, plastic bags, plastic gift wraps and straws the list is endless.
  • So what can we do? We believe the answer is Upcycling! And one really interesting way to upcycle already existing everyday plastic lying around us is through Eco Bricks.

An Eco brick is a plastic bottle packed to a set density with used plastic. It’s created by filling a plastic bottle with dry plastic until it’s packed tightly and can be used as a building block. Made of non-biodegradable plastics, Ecobricks will never break down and hence is the greenest solution to build permanent structures from buildings to furniture – which makes them a great way to reduce the plastic waste sent to landfill, extend the life of plastics manufactured for single use and build more affordable infrastructure from pre-existing materials. How To Make An Eco Brick (Image Credits: Greenpop Organisation) History The story of EcoBricks starts in Guatemala, and takes us, via the Philippines, to South Africa. Susanna Heisse, an environmental activist in Guatemala developed the first construction system with Eco bricks in 2003 for solving plastic pollution challenges faced in Lake Atitlan communities.

She built a wall out of them, which became an inspiration to others around the world. This led to one of the first towns in South Africa called Greyton to design schools, community gardens and an eco village based on this concept. Later Ian Dommisse, an architect based in Port Elizabeth got so highly inspired that he started an EcoBrick Exchange, a network of local business partners who are happy to offer storage space and discounts in exchange for EcoBricks, as well as community swap shops, where second hand items of value are exchanged for EcoBricks.

“It’s such a transforming act. When you see how much plastic goes into one bottle and you see how much plastic is in your daily lifethe idea is that the habit makes you more conscious of your daily footprint.” – Ian Dommisse Advantages of Ecobricks –

  • Plastics are durable in nature hence eco bricks provide longevity.
  • As you know plastics remain the same for 1000 years or more, hence eco bricks will never break down.
  • By nature, plastic is water resistant so whatever you make out of eco bricks, it will be safe from water.
  • Seeing blocks and buildings around you made out of basically rubbish becomes a source of inspiration for everyone to reduce their plastic waste.
  • All this plastic would otherwise end up in our oceans, Eco bricks prevent that from happening.
  • A lot of plastic waste is burnt which in turn creates pollution so eco bricks in a way help reduce global warming.
  • If thrown away, plastics break down into micro plastics. Eco bricks helps to reduce the harmful effects of plastic degradation.
  • Ecobricks is a low energy solution to plastic waste as it doesn’t demand technology or funds. It can be made anywhere by anyone with the basic abilities and some waste in hand.

Make your own Ecobrick – Ecobricks are very simple to make and you can start making yours by simply collecting a few plastic bottles, preferably of the same size and follow the steps.

  1. Collect, clean and dry plastic waste at home. Items such as foil, cling wrap or any other non-recyclables will be sure to fill up your Eco brick.
  2. Compress waste into a plastic bottle with a stick. An old-fashioned wooden spoon handle does the trick.
  3. Pack tightly after every level to ensure the waste is properly compacted.
  4. Squeeze the bottle with your hand to check if it’s tight and full enough or tries standing on it to see if it holds your weight.
  5. Seal tightly with the bottle top! And now you’re ready to use your Eco Brick.

How To Make An Eco Brick Get started today. Turn your next bottle into an Eco Brick and see how that changes the way you think about waste. : Eco Bricks – A revolutionary way of upcycling everyday plastics

What are sustainable bricks made of?

When compared to many other facing materials such as so-called concrete bricks, plastics, glass and others, natural clay brick remains one of the most eco-friendly, flexible, cost effective and beautiful materials used in construction. Click here for more.

How are plastic bricks made?

by Meta Gewald A brick, one of the building blocks of society, made from our waste. It almost sounds too good to be true, Nzambi Matee from Nairobi, Kenya is the inventor of the plastic brick. Contrary to what you may expect, the plastic bricks are twice as sturdy as concrete, the performance is optimized.

The bricks consist of mixture of sand and plastics. The sand and plastic are mixed at very high temperatures and are then compressed into bricks. Matee is a materials engineer that combined her intellectual knowledge with real world action and delivered a simple and sustainable product. Seeing all the plastic bags everywhere and other plastic waste polluting her country she became both frustrated (as the most of us do) and motivated.

Now Matee is the founder of Gjenge Makers, Nairobi, where they produce the plastic bricks. The factory produces around 1500 bricks a day out of a mix of different plastics. This blog describes why I believe that this innovation could be considered as a frugal innovation. Mixing of plastics, Source: Gjenge Makers What aspects makes this an innovation frugal? Two aspects stand out. This innovation promotes a circular economy and is very much affordable. As said earlier the bricks are a mix of sand, higher density plastics, received from factory waste, and lower density plastics, received from other recyclers.

Gjenge Makers accepts waste that other facilities can not recycle, such as plastic milk and shampoo bottles, sandwich bags, buckets and ropes. “There is that waste they cannot process anymore; they cannot recycle. That is what we get,” Matee told Reuters, Thus, the plastic bricks provide a use for factory waste and ensures it is recycled.

Lower density plastics are bought from local recyclers. This leads to the promotion of recycling in the local environment and provides jobs. Plastic that used to be valued as trash and would have been trash for hundreds of years is now turned into a simple high-quality product. Nzambi Matee utilized her innovative engineering skills to convert plastic waste into building materials, credits Designboom Another reason why I would say this innovation is indeed a frugal innovation is it’s price. The bricks sell at 850 Kenyan shillings, $7,70, per square meter which make them cheaper than normal bricks.

Since it is made from waste the material, costs are very low. This also translates into a low product price. Matee made sure the bricks are affordable to Kenyan citizens. Moreover, it is produced in Kenya and is not reliant on importations. Besides this bringing the price down, it also involves the community.

Genje Makers produces locally. The start-up serves as a job provider, especially for youth groups and women. They help the community by providing affordable and available bricks that can help in the making of houses, schools, roads etcetera. Which in their place provide education, easier access to health and shelter to people.

The product is also not overengineered or overdesigned. Everything that is necessary in a brick is there and as mentioned earlier, it is even stronger than concrete. According to Weyrauch and Herstatt something is a frugal innovation if it leads to substantial cost reduction, concentration on core functionalities and optimized performance.

Matee’s bricks easily meet these criteria. Furthermore, the start-up and production connects a community and promotes a circular economy. One of the few concerns I have is that overtime microplastics may come from the bricks into the soil. It would be interesting to read or hear more about this aspect.

  • If this blog story spiked your interest, please watch the below video and join the conversation about frugal innovation, frugal building materials and/or microplastics on LinkedIn,
  • What are frugal innovations? In this blog series we publish 10 examples from all over the world, written by our Students and Ambassadors from the minor Frugal Innovation for Sustainable Global Development.

Stay Frugally tuned for more blogs and join the conversation on LinkedIn,

Is brick an eco-friendly material?

Skip to content Brick is the best choice if you want to stay in the GREEN when making earth-friendly choices. Brick is a highly sustainable building material. With its long lifecycle, energy efficiency, minimal waste and many recycling options, brick is one of the greenest choices you can make. How To Make An Eco Brick