How Old Cement Can Be Used?

How Old Cement Can Be Used
Leading Cement Brand in India Cement is the most essential raw material for your home construction. But most people don’t have enough information about cement to ensure that they don’t compromise the quality of their home. We address the customer’s needs and are with them in every stage of their home construction providing them with guidance and information. How Old Cement Can Be Used

How long can cement be stored?

Shelf Life of Cement/Lifespan of Cement – Cement is commonly used as a building material for most homes. Cement is a versatile, lightweight material that holds up to harsh conditions. However, even though concrete may look strong and durable, its shelf life is not as long as you might expect.

In fact, concrete is not only susceptible to moisture but also to other environmental factors such as temperature and light. Cement is the first material that we think of when we want to build a house or any other structure. There are many construction materials that are used to construct a house or building but cement has a major role to play with respect to its life, strength, and cost.

its own valuable impression Most people seem to be unaware that cement has a shelf life. Cement is a hygroscopic material, meaning it absorbs moisture. Because of this property of cement, it is important that it be used before its “best before” date to ensure a long-lasting foundation.

Is it safe to use too long old cement?

Cement – How old is too old? Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2006 03:40 pm I need to do some concrete work and I have some cement but it is about a year old. Is that too old to expect it to solidify properly? (I know we must have a cement expert on this forum somewhere) Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 3,673 • Replies: 8 1 Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2006 03:43 pm No expert, but dry shelf life is indefinate.

Wet shelf life is zip.1 Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2006 03:51 pm Are you sure Roger? I remember reading that part of the problem with the big dig tunnel in Boston is that they used old cement. I seem to recall someone saying it loses it’s ability to bond with the sand if it has been sitting around too long. I just don’t know what is meant by “too long”,1 Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2006 03:51 pm You can use cement without any problem 6 months after you bought it.

One year shouldn’t do any harm to concrete, too. Two years old cement, well, you shouldn’t use that at all. However: cement looses its taste after two months – just in case you need it for cooking 😉 Honestly, you can use it – perhaps add a bit more than you would use normally – to be on the safe side.1 Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2006 03:52 pm Thanks Walter (and Roger) I’ll experiment in a small area and see how it gels.1 Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2006 03:59 pm Green Witch wrote: I just don’t know what is meant by “too long”,

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I’ve just checked it (I’ve worked as a “concrete unskilled worker” during university holidays, besides being born in a town with a huge cement indutry – and a football club, called “concrete heads” 😉 ): one year really should work.1 Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2006 04:13 pm Just what we need, Walter. Concrete cookies, tasteless but for the occasional chocolate chip.

Speaking of which, GreenWitch, you know better than to get that stuff on your skin, right? If you don’t, I’ll tell you now. It is really tough on the complexion.1 Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2006 04:22 pm Actually, I’m fairly experienced with using the stuff and I’ve got the rubber gloves and face mask at the ready.

How do I know when cement expires?

What can I do with old bags of cement? One of them, and one of the most basic, is cement, since you will buy it in large quantities and it is vital that you know that it has an expiration date and that its useful life is shortened once the bag or sack is opened.

You should find the expiration date on the packaging, since certified products must have it. It is usual for a bag of cement to have an expiration date of 45 days after the day it was packaged, so that the cement retains all its properties, usefulness and quality. The best thing to do in these cases is not to take any risks, because no matter how cheap a bag of cement of a non-recognized brand may be, it is most likely expired and our work is at high risk of collapse.

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Can I use 2 year old cement?

Cement – How old is too old? Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2006 03:40 pm I need to do some concrete work and I have some cement but it is about a year old. Is that too old to expect it to solidify properly? (I know we must have a cement expert on this forum somewhere) Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 3,673 • Replies: 8 1 Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2006 03:43 pm No expert, but dry shelf life is indefinate.

  • Wet shelf life is zip.1 Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2006 03:51 pm Are you sure Roger? I remember reading that part of the problem with the big dig tunnel in Boston is that they used old cement.
  • I seem to recall someone saying it loses it’s ability to bond with the sand if it has been sitting around too long.
  • I just don’t know what is meant by “too long”,1 Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2006 03:51 pm You can use cement without any problem 6 months after you bought it.

One year shouldn’t do any harm to concrete, too. Two years old cement, well, you shouldn’t use that at all. However: cement looses its taste after two months – just in case you need it for cooking 😉 Honestly, you can use it – perhaps add a bit more than you would use normally – to be on the safe side.1 Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2006 03:52 pm Thanks Walter (and Roger) I’ll experiment in a small area and see how it gels.1 Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2006 03:59 pm Green Witch wrote: I just don’t know what is meant by “too long”,

I’ve just checked it (I’ve worked as a “concrete unskilled worker” during university holidays, besides being born in a town with a huge cement indutry – and a football club, called “concrete heads” 😉 ): one year really should work.1 Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2006 04:13 pm Just what we need, Walter. Concrete cookies, tasteless but for the occasional chocolate chip.

Speaking of which, GreenWitch, you know better than to get that stuff on your skin, right? If you don’t, I’ll tell you now. It is really tough on the complexion.1 Reply Wed 27 Dec, 2006 04:22 pm Actually, I’m fairly experienced with using the stuff and I’ve got the rubber gloves and face mask at the ready.